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Coronavirus (COVID-19) School Closure Updates and Information » CUHSD Reopening Steering Committee

CUHSD Reopening Steering Committee

CUHSD has worked in partnership with CHSTA to launch a Reopening Steering Committee. This committee is comprised of teachers, administrators and District Office personnel with the goal of developing a set of recommendations for the Superintendent to consider on how to reopen schools for the 2020-2021 school year. These recommendations will address the impacts of current school closures and the likelihood of an ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. Due to the anticipation of additional guidance from the County before July 1, the committee will potentially meet in early July to further narrow the recommendations to the most likely scenario.
 
The committee launched a set of subcommittees to develop recommendations by topic (see list below) and shared recommendations with the full committee. The subcommittees represent a membership of 76 teachers, classified staff, administrators, and district office staff across sites and subject matter expertise.
Reopening Steering Committee Recommendations to the Superintendent June 2020

Introduction


Due to the current pandemic and social distancing rules being enforced in Santa Clara County, Campbell Union High School District (CUHSD) closed its schools March 16 and finished the Spring Semester with distance learning online.  In order to develop a set of recommendations for the Superintendent that anticipate numerous reopening scenarios in the fall, District Office staff worked in collaboration with the Campbell High School Teachers Association (CHSTA) to form the Reopening Steering Committee (RSC).  This committee is composed of 24 teachers, classified staff, administrators, and district office personnel. 


The RSC held nine meetings between May 6, and June 10, 2020.  At these meetings, the RSC members brainstormed recommendation ideas, reviewed resource materials, and shared best practices being used during distance learning. Eight subcommittees were formed to address specific considerations around safety, instruction, and well-being with at least two RSC members serving as co-chairs for each subcommittee. The sections of this document reflect the work of each subcommittee.


The full staff community was engaged in the process in multiple ways. A survey was sent to all CUHSD staff on May 14 to gauge their interest in participating in a subcommittee. From the individuals who showed interest, the co-chairs selected additional staff to join their subcommittees. Once all members were selected, the subcommittees represented 76 staff members across sites, roles and subject areas. The subcommittee members met separately from the RSC and drafted their sections of the recommendations. During the first week of June, these drafts were shared with the full RSC for review and were additionally shared with members of the CUHSD staff community who indicated interest in the survey but were not part of a subcommittee.


In addition to including a broad representation of staff members on subcommittees, community input was collected from additional stakeholders throughout the process. On May 11, the Learning from Home survey was sent to all students to gather their input on their experiences with distance learning. On May 21, surveys were sent to parents/guardians in English and Spanish and also to staff to gather information about their preferences on various reopening scenarios. The RSC members also met with the District English Learners Advisory Committee (DELAC), the Superintendent’s Student Advisory Council, and the President’s Council (a group of parent site representatives) to gather additional input.  


A publicly-facing RSC website was developed and staff newsletter articles were shared throughout May and June to communicate the work of the committee to the CUHSD staff community. The RSC website includes meeting agendas, a list of committee and subcommittee members, and links to the results of the surveys.  There is also a Google Form for all stakeholders to fill out to provide input or ask questions about the reopening of schools. 


In this document, the RSC outlines five different scenarios under which schools may reopen:

Scenario 1: No pandemic and schools are open

Scenario 2: Fluctuating pandemic with temporary closures during the year

Scenario 3: Continued pandemic with shifts of 50% students on campus at a time

Scenario 4: Continued pandemic with limited students and staff allowed on campus

Scenario 5: Continued pandemic with current sheltering restrictions


Each subcommittee was asked to focus on Scenario 3 due to the perceived likelihood of continued social distancing requirements and to leverage the input of numerous stakeholders to address the complexity of the scenario.


Moving forward, the RSC is committed to reconvening after July 1 in anticipation of the release of additional information from local public health officials to further narrow the recommendations to the most likely scenario.  The next draft of recommendations will then be developed and bargained with local bargaining units.  


Across the subcommittees, there were some common themes and areas of consensus. Below is a summary of the recommendations the RSC encourages the District to put in place no matter the scenario CUHSD is faced within the Fall of 2020.


Site communication teams

Each site should have a team of three to five people who comprise the site level communications team.  This team will work with the principal of the school to ensure that all school matters are communicated clearly to all stakeholders.  This team will play an important role in helping students, families and teachers to get the information needed for reopening schools in the fall.


Streamlined technology platforms

Each school site should limit to a minimum the number of technology platforms to be consistently used for communication, assignments, and grades.  While there is not a consensus on the specific learning management system to use districtwide, there is consensus from the RSC for sites to have flexibility in their choice of piloting a site-wide learning management system in the 2020-2021 school year.   To date, three sites have opted to use Canvas for the 2020-2021 school year.  There is general consensus to use Remind as the primary communication tool between teachers and students/families. 


Flexible attendance for students

The RSC recommends that attendance, in times of campus closures, should reflect flexibility for students. Positive attendance should be taken into consideration whenever students are participating remotely.


Multi-tiered System of Support (MTSS)

Schools should utilize the principles of MTSS to provide for a range of supports based on student need, including mental health services and interventions. This will involve the school sites training teachers, administrators and support staff. 


Prioritizing in-person school options

The RSC recommends that students have access in-person instruction to the extent allowable while adhering to local public health guidelines. Feedback was received from staff, parents/guardians, and students that in-person time is important for socioemotional well-being and learning. Special consideration should be made for labs, hands-on projects or performance-based courses, including PE, VAPA, STEM, and CTE, as well as for students with special needs or circumstances (IEP, English learners, homeless, foster, migrant, etc.). 


Intentionally teaching online skills

In order to set our students up for success in a school year the RSC recommends that in the beginning of the year there is a 2-3 week time frame that is devoted to training students and families on platforms and tech tools the school site will utilize regardless of campus closures. 


A robust mentorship / cohort model 

Due to the challenges of connecting with students and maintaining engagement, teachers would have a cohort of students (roughly 20 students to 1 teacher). This teacher would act as a point of contact and mentor to their students and check in with them regularly. Time can be built into the school schedule during morning or evening hours to promote flexibility in student and parent outreach. Students should be grouped with their own teachers.


Teacher team collaboration

Establishing teacher teams by department and encouraging course-alike curriculum development. This will enable teachers to collaborate in developing online materials and promote consistency in the learning experience for students.


Create an academic support hotline

It is recommended that an academic support hotline is set up to offer tutoring and supports for an extended period of time throughout the day.  Teachers, peer tutors, and administrators would offer supports depending on the needs.  


Preparation and prevention 

Ensure that sites have adequate supplies of basic first aid materials and that staff are trained on their use, sanitize all frequented facilities on a regular basis, and make adjustments as needed to food distribution. Revise site safety plans to include protocols for future outbreaks.

Highly Effective Instruction

Subcommittee Members: Chris Nalls, Emily Hanson, Sayuri Chen, Laurel Garceau, Katie Bennett, Holly Royaltey, Lynette Jackson, and Tiffany Padia


Subcommittee Goal 


Develop a set of recommendations for how departments and school sites should move forward with content development.


Summary of Recommendations


Learning goals that emphasize essential standards and skills - The Highly Effective Instruction subcommittee recommends that each site should establish learning goals for the grade levels with an emphasis on skills and organizational development.  Additionally, departments should work to prioritize standards and skills so that students are getting the essential content needed to move to the next level of a course while mastering the current level of work.  This work must be done to prepare for all scenarios as even if students are able to start school in a traditional format at the beginning of the school year, there could be extended closures in place throughout the school year.  


This subcommittee focused recommendations into three areas, curriculum, instruction and assessment.  Below is a list of recommendations from the subcommittee for moving forward for all scenarios.  The work to complete these recommendations will need to be done in site department teams with support from site and district administration.  


The focus for all recommendations should be on grade-level standards based work that is a priority for students to master content and move onto the next level.


Multiple Modes of Access to Teaching and Learning - Students should have access to curriculum, instruction and assessments by going through multiple venues and with multiple opportunities.

  • Access to all materials online - To promote equitable access to materials, all instructional materials should by default be available asynchronously and online.
  • Incorporate student engagement online and offline - utilize discussion, interaction, and student grouping strategies that can be applied both online and remotely, synchronously or asynchronously (breakout rooms, discussion forums, chat logs, annotation, games, etc.).
  • Project-based or portfolio style assignments - Promote higher-order learning through assignments that include analytic and creative activities.
  • Secure online assessments - Find tools that can support the delivery of secure assessments online, particularly in the areas of math and science. To ensure that students are being assessed on what standards they have mastered.
  • Packets of take-home materials for hands-on classes - Some courses may need to provide students with materials packets to complete hands-on projects at home, including VAPA, STEM, and CTE. These packets should be available based on student need (IEP or lack of materials at home) or for physical projects or labs.
  • In-person options wherever and as often as possible - Utilize outdoor spaces, larger rooms or small groups as needed for sports, labs, physical projects or performance-based courses, including PE, VAPA, STEM, and CTE.

Curriculum Recommendations

What is needed to implement effectively

Course alike collaboration (Common Viable Curriculum) with the question in mind: “What is essential?”

  • Site Teams work in departments and course alikes to establish priorities.
  • Department Chairs share out work with all DCs.

Planning time within the workweek (possibly one day per week?)

  • Use of Collaboration time
  • Department Meetings
  • Staff Meetings
  • Prep Periods
  • Common set of  tools

Agreements around specific core standards by subject and level (Content and Skills) 

  • Training in understanding the progression standards
  • CAASPP Blueprints for ELA/Math

Consistent alignment in performance expectations across courses and grade level

  • Fully understanding AR 5121 Grade Definitions
  • Completion of Grading Task Force Module trainings.




Instruction Recommendations

What is needed to implement effectively

Consistent organization of materials on the given platform (google classroom, canvas, etc)

  • Again, working in course alike teams to establish what is the best way to organize content
  • Site level organization for common materials and platforms 
  • Agreed upon platform and template by site with training for teachers, admin, students and families. 
  • Creation of site level templates for common platforms
  • Creation of department templates for common platforms

Consistent strategies being used

  • AVID strategies
  • Breakout Rooms (Zoom)
  • Site level training on best practices that the AVID Coordinator and Site Administration provide with support from DO Administration
  • Creation of site level shared best practices web-page
  • Resource page of best practices by department on DO internal site page



Assessment Recommendations

What is needed to implement effectively

Multiple Versions of Assessments 

  • Work with teams of teachers by course alike or departments to develop multiple versions of the same assessment, focusing on the essential standards for that assessment.

Project-Based Assessments across content areas

  • Training in fully planning and using PBL
  • Department work

Consistent alignment in performance expectations across courses and grade level

  • Fully understanding AR 5121 Grade Definitions
  • Completion of Grading Task Force Module trainings
  • Assessments should be scoring only on content standards being addressed

Continuum of Instructional Plans

Subcommittee members: Anna Lucas, Erin Hinshaw, Jennifer Hall, Jennifer Orlick, Kira Durant, Steven Turner, Barbara West, Archana Nekkar, Sameen Shoenhair, 

and Matt de Cesare


Subcommittee Goal 


Develop a set of recommendations to describe a range of instructional models, educational technology systems, and flexible school schedules to adapt to multiple potential reopening scenarios in the fall.


Summary of Recommendations


Increase access to learning supports as learning shifts towards an online setting - Students should be able to access multiple forms of support structures, which becomes increasingly important as learning shifts more towards online environments. Ideas supported by the subcommittee include: a mentorship/cohort model where each teacher is a point of contact for a group of their own students (20-30) to check in with individually on a regular basis (Boynton model), access to a homework center on a regular basis that is managed by the school site (Zoom breakout rooms or in-person on campus), a way to teach online skills to build organizational and SEL skills needed to thrive in online environments, and an academic support hotline (these topics are also discussed in Addressing Learning Gaps) . 

  • A robust mentorship / cohort model - In which small teams of teachers are charged with a cohort of students as their point of contact (roughly 20 students to 1 teacher). This teacher would act as a point of contact and mentor to their students. Ideally the teacher would “loop” with the students to build trust and community over time. Time can be built into the school schedule during morning or evening hours to promote flexibility in student and parent outreach (Boynton Model). AVID teachers should be leveraged to provide guidance on best practices. Students should be grouped wherever possible with their own teachers.
  • Homework center - In addition to teacher-controlled tutorials/office hours, school schedules could incorporate regular time blocks, ideally in the afternoon, to support student peer collaboration on homework and community-building. This can be managed by the school site (teachers as an activity duty, administrators, classified employees, etc.) or official District volunteers. This would provide more time for students to work together on projects, learn and practice together outside the classroom, and build the student community.
  • Intentionally teaching online skills - In order to set our students up for success in a school year that will likely be shifting from distance to hybrid or in-person, begin the year with a 2-3 week orientation course, a bootcamp, a peer orientation (Gen Yes meets Link Crew), or check-ins with a focus on skills and SEL (examples include: building a schedule for the week, note-taking, online collaboration, a “how to” for school norms and communication). The course or guiding information would be self paced, could be offered optionally over the summer, could use badges as part of incentive, but the bulk of the incentive would be need-based - the information will actually help a student navigate the school, in-person or distance. This could take the form of an online course that is self-paced for students and is additionally available to parents/guardians facilitated by the mentor/cohort teacher. This could be scheduled during the first weeks of tutorial (alternating with orientation content) and/or during homework center hours. Content should include: how to use devices, access to learning materials, digital citizenship, digital literacy, and other topics as needed.
  • Create an academic support hotline - Modeled after the success of the technology helpline, students could also access live academic support, parent support, resources for families. This could be a live chat feature on the website, an app, or integrated through Remind or Google Classroom. The helpline could be attended by teachers, peer tutors, and/or admin depending on the purpose and need. An asynchronous forum or question-and-answer system could be implemented for students to connect with peers for advice and support. For English learners, a discussion space could allow for them to practice speaking with an English-fluent peer. Sites could also explore services such as BrainFuse, an online K-12 tutoring service available through the Santa Clara County Library District. The hotline/forum could also be centralized to pool tutors across sites for support in core courses.

Structured Community-Building and Collaboration

    • Meaningful time for teachers to connect with students and each other - Time is built into the schedule to (1) check-in between teachers and their cohort of students / families on a weekly or bi-weekly basis and (2) collaboration in departments or course-alike teams. This can be a day of the week with no live lessons and/or leverage the morning when teachers tend to be awake and students are not (before 9am). 
    • Prioritize teacher teams - Build time into any adopted schedule (in-person, hybrid, or online) to prioritize teacher collaboration in teams. This can include cross curricular, department, or course-alike teams and be organized across the District on one learning management system (LMS) as appropriate. To streamline planning, assignment development, and curriculum, allow for flexibility in teacher schedules, and potentially improve student learning during teacher absences, efforts should be made to allow for teachers to plan and teach in teams. To facilitate more time for this, schedules may have less set times for instruction. Teacher teams will be critical to support the full staff community as some staff members may need additional help with preparing online courses or have special circumstances preventing them from providing live or in-person instruction during the continued pandemic.
  • Course-alike collaboration - Teams of teachers should be working on common curriculums per course. This will ensure students have access to the same materials. Students can also collaborate with one another regardless of the teacher.

Minimum requirements for live instruction - At minimum, one-hour blocks of live instruction two times per week per course period (2 hours total at minimum) regardless of the scenario. This would be in addition to homework, tutorial, or office hours. Students should expect a range of 1 to 1.5 hours of homework per each hour of live instruction. Homework expectations may be further defined by policy under development by the Student Board Members.


Using an online learning management system - A learning management system is an application (e.g., Google Classroom, Canvas, Altitude Learning) designed to organize instructional materials, assignments, and assessments; submit and review student work; provide student feedback and post grades; provide access to primary and additional resources (including other educational tools and applications); and communicate progress to students and families. Moving forward, all instructional materials should be available to students by default in one site-based online learning management system to allow for access to materials outside of the regular school day and during a period of distance learning. The District should provide training and guidance around which systems are supported and on how to use them. Sites should also link to the District technology staff resources webpage. While the subcommittee consensus is consistency in the level of implementation, the overall recommendation is that sites be allowed to select an LMS to pilot and train on in the 2020-2021 school year.


Consistent education technology platforms - Regardless of the instructional model or schedule, the subcommittee has received substantial feedback from the staff, parent/guardian, and student community that Phase 2 included a superfluous number of systems that were difficult to navigate. With the District moving forward with 1-1 devices at all sites and continuing to provide wifi to students who need it, there are opportunities to streamline and ensure access to all students. The recommendations include:

  • School sites should agree on a maximum of one system each for the following purposes and a minimum number of systems that accomplish the majority of tasks: communication, learning management system, and gradebook. 
    • Remind should be the main communication platform to be used between teachers and parents or students because it supports texts, phone calls, and emails in multiple languages and includes privacy features to protect staff, family, and student data.
    • One learning management tool is selected per site, such as Google Classroom, Canvas, School Loop, or Altitude Learning.
    • One gradebook is used per site, such as Aeries, Canvas, Altitude Learning, or School Loop.
  • To the extent feasible, centralized systems are used as hubs for posting assignments, grades, and communicating with students/families. The purpose of each tool must be clear to families and students and communicated broadly. For example, teachers who utilize additional learning tools or applications, should ensure they are integrated with or linked from the learning management system. 
  • Sites should prepare documentation (i.e., a cheat sheet) for parents/guardians that clearly defines the purpose of each tool and how to stay informed about student work and post this prominently in principal communications and also on the school’s website in multiple languages. 

Flexible schedules adaptable to numerous scenarios, prioritizing in-person instruction - The sample schedules provided in the following sections can in many cases be adapted to allow more or fewer students on campus. A hybrid model that splits students into two groups that allows 50% of students on campus could be further split across two weeks to reduce the number of students in classrooms to 25%. There could also be a cohort of students who are taking courses completely online in an independent study program or virtual school due to COVID-related student and family health risks or illness. When students are at home, they should be able to access learning materials (if not instruction) at the same time as their in-person classmates. The subcommittee acknowledges that any schedule may require adjustments based on the amount of time needed for cleaning and lunch distribution as guidance from public health officials becomes available. As schedules move online, promote flexibility by starting classes no earlier than 9 a.m.



Overview of Schedule Recommendations

① = the subcommittee’s first choice for the scenario
✓ = applicable for the scenario
✗ = not recommended for the scenario 

* = two equally valid ways to address the same idea


 

Scenario 1

Scenario 2

Scenario 3

Scenario 4

Scenario 5

Schedule I

Schedule II

Schedule III

①*

Schedule IV

Schedule V

Schedule VI

Schedule VII

Schedule VIII

①*



Scenario 1 - No pandemic, all is well and no restrictions

Title

Description

Schedules

A. Traditional model and Introduce Blended Learning

In-person with materials posted online in a central location

Regular Block A/B Schedule

B. Later start time / shorter school day (flexible “seat time” minutes)

Flipped and blended learning models to support a more flexible model in which Students can stay home when they are sick or to help family members or  with less risk of falling behind or without having to rely on the teacher to get caught up. Recognize that students and educators will be returning to school having experienced trauma. The school day can start later without going later so students can play sports and other extracurricular activities. Classtime would prioritize collaboration, community building, and SEL. 

Later start time and shorter school day or a 4 day in-person week with a remote learning day.


Shortened instructional days can be used to promote student choice projects, such as a student choice day, passion project, wonder day, or an opportunity for students to pursue internships.

C. Pilot Cross-Curricular Pathways

Pilot cross curricular pathways to streamline the amount of siloed work students and teachers are doing for individual subject areas. Example: 9th grade English/Biology or 10th-12th grade English/History. Classes would be co-taught. (LGHS has models that we can learn from.) 

Similar to current schedule but with adjustments to pilot larger or longer co-taught periods.


Scenario 2 - Fluctuating pandemic, temporary closures once or more during the year

Title

Description

Schedules

A. Site-Based Emergency Distance Schedules

Teachers and administrators develop plans to prepare for emergency shifts to remote learning, with special consideration of special education, ELD, lab science, and CTE/VAPA courses. Assignments and instructional materials are regularly posted to online platforms throughout the year and are available to students in the event of temporary closures. 


If schools close teachers begin checking in with their cohort individually on at least a biweekly basis. 

School sites develop emergency distance learning plans if possible before the beginning of school with schedules that are ready to implement if a closure occurs. These can be adapted to provide additional flexibility for students and staff.




Scenarios 3 and 4: Considerations for Prioritizing Student Groups for In-Person Instruction

Topic

Model

Schedule

Students with special needs/circumstances 

Access would also be available to students with special needs: missing technology, no home supervision, transfer students, ELs, foster youth, homeless, migrant, students with IEPs.

 

Focus on Freshmen 

Prioritize incoming 9th grade students for in-person instruction during the first several weeks of the school year. This case study from a Chicago public school district demonstrates the power of prioritizing 9th graders.



Many of the schedules would work but instead of breaking up all students into groups, 9th graders would be prioritized for face-to-face time with their teachers. During this time, other grade levels would be distance learning for academic classes but would also be in mentorship cohorts (ideally with a teacher who they already know) and, if allowed, could come to campus for mental health services or community circles.

“By Appointment” or referral model via teacher/admin outreach (a version of this could also be applied in scenario 4)

Students would come to campus by appointment for mental health services, counseling, food services, “study hall” or check-ins (indoor or outdoor), individual and small group check-ins (utilizing restorative practices and community circles). 


Small group meetings or interventions are held on campus as needed, including IEP, 504, SST, mental health counseling, office hours, and college/career counseling.

The campus would be open in two chunks daily (before meal pick up and after meal pick up). During open chunks students can sign up to come to campus with a certain number of spots reserved for drop-in. This would be by student choice, not mandated by a set schedule.

Limit number of courses taken at the same time



The purpose is to promote a focus on one area of study to reduce the complexity of an online setting. This would be similar to a quarter or trimester system.


Recommend reducing to fewer courses if a higher percentage of instruction is online. 


Teachers build lessons with each other.

This could look like one class at a time or up to 4 classes at a time. Alternating cohorts are necessary to abide by social distancing.


Students who would benefit from additional continuity could be scheduled to take a full course sequence within a year (i.e., world languages, math, etc.).



Scenario 3 - Continued pandemic, hybrid online/in-person 

Description

Models

Schedules

A. Three Student Groups, A/B Schedule


Option includes:

  • Equal grouping
  • Rotating cohorts
  • A/B  periods
  • One group online only




Students are divided into three groups (A,B,C) where groups A and B attend classes on campus and C students attend classes online. Ideally, the groups will be about even (⅓ each) to lessen the class sizes. A student body of 1600 would be ~530 students to allow for social distancing. 

Teachers could either be divided as well, into on campus or online groups

Groups A and B (on campus) would receive ‘traditional’ in-person instruction based on the teacher’s preference and planning. Group C could be a fully online cohort.

Schedule I


Three groups of students: A, B, C

Groups A and B have on campus classes every other day, group C is completely online.

Periods 0-7 taught each day for ~55-60 minutes each, with a passing period and lunch. A students attend their classes in person on A days, B students attend their classes on B days. C students attend via distance learning and do not attend classes on campus.

All three groups would be in separate class sections. For instance, groups A,B and C might all be in the same course/period but each group would be its own section number. 

B. All students access in-person instruction with rotating groups to address social distancing/sanitation considerations


Option includes:

  • Two or three rotating student groups
  • Use only half of campus at a time
  • A day for collaboration and/or sanitation

Schedule II - Each period is broken into three groups (a, b, and c) and using only half of campus each day; each small subgroup receives 75 minutes of direct, in-person instruction a week in conjunction with online assignments. This keeps in line with the projected number of students socially distanced in classrooms at one time (~11). This would be less than 50% on campus at any given time.


Schedule III - This splits classrooms into two groups with 50% of students on campus at a time with no class on Wednesdays to accommodate teacher collaboration and homework centers.

Schedule II - three groups, half off campus at a time


Schedule III - two groups, 1 day off


Could be re-worked to include an optional “study hall” period at the day’s end instead of assigned one during the school day to avoid issues with numbers.

C. Rotating block schedule with time for on-campus homework centers


  • Periods are at different times on A/B days 
  • A day off for collaboration and homework centers

Rotating block schedule that offers multiple periods a day, with periods cycling through  to be offered at different times. The purpose is to allow students additional opportunities to access live instruction if they need to work or support siblings at specific times of the day.


Each class is divided in half. The first time the class meets in the week, one half attends the class on campus, while the other half attends online (via synchronous instruction such as Zoom, or asynchronous instruction such as Google Classroom or Canvas). The second time the class meets, the groups are reversed (the on campus half attends online, and the online half attends on campus).


Also, there are some example schedules that give a ‘day off’ from classes during the week, where students have home room/HW center/Tutorials scheduled, and teachers have collaboration and prep time. The student options could be a mix of on and off campus options, with admin support.

Schedule IV

All periods are offered twice during the course of the week. Each class is divided in half, with one half attending on campus the first time the class is offered during the week, and the other attending on campus the second time the class is offered in the week.  For example, a first period aBiology class would see half of the students attend the class on campus Monday at 9:30 am, then the second half would attend the same Biology class Wednesday at 2:15 pm.

For the schedules that include the ‘off day’ for students, the home room/ HW center/ Tutorials could be either optional or mandatory, with or without specific enrollment lists.



Scenario 4 - Continued pandemic, limited students/staff allowed on campus

Description

Models

Schedules

A. Students attend one day a week (25% on campus) 

  • Four groups of students
  • Day off for collaboration, student supports

This option continues to prioritize in-person opportunities for all students, achieving 25% of students on campus.

Schedule V

Students are in four groups, attending the same day each with rotating A/B schedules biweekly

B. 25% of students on campus with rotating biweekly schedule

While Group A is on campus, Group B watches class sessions live on Zoom. The next week they flip, and Group B is on campus while Group A Zooms their class sessions.

Schedule VI

C. Learner centered approach 


For students, this provides for whole group time, individual check-ins for mentoring, and also flexible work blocks for playlists or projects.  

photo of student

In this new model, the building blocks for teachers become as follows:


  • Morning Meeting 
  • Individual Check-Ins (in scenario 4 these check ins could be in-person by appointment)
  • Class Meetings 
  • Planning & Assessment
  • Teacher Team Meeting (in scenario 4 these check ins could be hybrid: in person / remote)

While the distribution of these functions is going to vary by context and by the developmental levels of the students, these building blocks represent the general functions of a teacher in a home-learning environment.  

Schedule VII


Teacher teams schedule their time to provide greater flexibility for learners than any one individual could possibly achieve. Schedules may differ each day based on student availability to do check-ins or instruction later in the day, for example.


Scenario 5 - Continued pandemic, current sheltering restrictions

Description

Models

Schedules

A. Live instruction multiple times per week with materials available online for access

Approach a flipped classroom model. Self-guided materials can be posted for pre-work and live sessions promote higher-order Depth of Knowledge levels (analyze, understand, create) activities. Instruction utilizes multiple opportunities for students to particulate in discussions and group work, including live breakout rooms, with the default being a “remote first” approach - discussions and formative assessments are posted online.

Schedule III

or

Schedule VIII


Periods meet at least twice per week for at least one hour at a time for live instruction. Continue use of additional tutorial time.

B. Learner Centered Approach


(See C. in Scenario 4 for additional details)

photo of student

Schedule VIIphoto of draft schedule

Special Education

Subcommittee members: Daron La Franchi, Dave Becker, Chee-Ah Thao, Leanne Haghighi, Cynthia Williams, Terri Lopopolo, Ophelia Gomez, and Taylor Wakefield


Subcommittee Goal 


Develop a set of recommendations to support the special education program in a variety of reopening scenarios with a focus on shifts needed for distance learning in the event that shelter-in-place continues.


Summary of Recommendations


Clear expectations of the Individualized Education Program (IEP) Process - There must be clear communication, collaboration, and implementation for all site personnel as it relates to the IEP process. This includes consistent use of online platforms for students to access instructional materials (see Continuum of Instructional Plans), monitoring IEPs, modifying IEPs to adapt to distance learning (e.g., teletherapy), adhering to timelines, and holding IEP meetings virtually as needed.


Clearly defined roles and procedures - Staff roles and expectations should be clarified for the continuum of staff members involved in special education supports (administrators, teachers, paraeducators, and related service providers). Paraeducators should be trained on their roles in virtual settings and expectations for supporting IEPs.


Instructional Accommodations - The delivery of and access to curriculum, assessments, and other classroom activities must include accommodations for students with disabilities, with special attention to virtual or socially distant learning environments. A variety of lesson design options should be utilized to support different types of student learning.


Focus on Scenario 5 and supports that can be implemented across all lesser restrictive scenarios. 


  • Scenario 1 - No pandemic, all is well and no restrictions
  • Scenario 3 - Continued pandemic, shifts of 50% students on campus at a time 
  • Scenario 4 - Continued pandemic, limited students/staff allowed on campus
  • Scenario 5 - Continued pandemic, current sheltering restrictions
    1. Equity/PD
      1. SUPPORTS FOR STUDENTS: Please refer to the Continuum of Learning plan section. Please also keep in mind that students with disabilities will need differentiated instruction within each plan as dictated by their unique learning needs and individualized educational programs (IEPs).
      2. SUPPORTS FOR TEACHERS: Professional Development Recommendations (site based/teacher led):
        1. General Info: 504 vs IEP; how students qualify; breakouts on supports specific to different disabilities (Leanne Haghighi has a PD on this ready to share)
        2. Best Practices for SPED:
          1. Consistency: where, when, how teachers are posting info 
          2. Utilizing Specific Platform Features:
            1. E.g., “topics” in Google Classroom
            2. Closed Captioning in YouTube
          3. Creating accessible assignments: 
            1. No acronyms
            2. Clear steps/chunked assignments
            3. Visual supports
          4. Implementing Accommodations in Online Learning: a sample document used by DMHS can be found here.
          5. Mild/Mod vs Mod/Severe Supports
        3. PD addressing overall student mental health/well-being (could be led by CASSY and School Psych, or by recommendation of the Well-being Committee)
          1. Ongoing mental health check-ins (create a sample template)
          2. Then refer to procedure doc for follow-up
        4. Case manager access to gen. ed. content/grades (not necessarily a PD, but something that needs to be considered. At the moment, SchoolLoop is the more accessible way for case managers to manage students vs Google Classroom/Canvas). It is recommended that case managers have access to their student’s Google Classrooms in order to help them stay ahead of things and stay updated on their student’s assignments.
      3. SUPPORTS FOR PARAEDUCATORS: 
        1. Supporting Students in Online Platforms: 
          1. Training in management features/include in site based trainings on tech used by teachers
          2. Facilitating breakout sessions
          3. Checking in with individual students
        2.  Include in all PDs, especially related to:
          1. Mental Health/Trauma Informed Education
          2. Tech Supports/Management
          3. Behavior Supports
    2. Least Restrictive Environment:

Least Restrictive Environment (LRE):  Per IDEA, LRE means that, to the maximum extent appropriate, school districts must educate students with disabilities in the regular classroom with appropriate aids and supports, referred to as "supplementary aids and services, " along with their nondisabled peers in the school they would attend if not disabled, unless a student's IEP requires some other arrangement. 

Not all students can learn in a general education classroom despite the provision of appropriate aids and supports. As such, depending upon the needs of these students, LRE would also refer to a guiding principle on how special education services will be provided through a continuum of placement options that range from the least restrictive setting to the most restrictive environments (i.e., General Ed Classroom, Special Education Classroom, Special School, Homebound, and Hospital / Residential Facility).  

Thus, how can LRE be implemented in a virtual classroom where students are staying home away from their peers? LRE in a virtual classroom means providing students with disabilities ACCESS to the following:

    1. LRE/Access to Gen Ed Peers:
  1. Access to the Core Curriculum 
    1. Provision of an online curriculum that is aligned with the general ed curriculum for students on a diploma track (i.e, core curriculum). (SAI- Mild Mod) 
    2. Provision of an online curriculum that is highly modified from the core curriculum but still provides low-level academic skills for students on a certificate of completion (SAI- Moderate-Severe)
    3. Access to materials beyond the online curriculum (Textbooks, Additional Printed Resources, Learning Materials for Project Completion)
    4. Increase elective opportunities for all students in order to provide multiple opportunities to recoup credits that may have been lost if a student did not pass a fall 2020 course. 
      1. Narrow Current Options for Students with Disabilities
      2. Electives Aligned with Transition Plan: this is a recommendation for both continued shelter-in-place and the regular school year. Classes such as “Careers,” or “Living on your own” can be directly tied to a student’s transition plan and support them in both meeting graduation requirements, and preparing for life after high school.
  2. Access to Technology 
    1. Ensure that students have access to the common instructional platforms (e,g, google classroom, school loop) used by gen ed students for remote learning (Mild-Mod/Mod-Sev)
    2. Ensure that all students especially students with special needs, have Chromebooks and wifi access/hot spot (Mild-Mod/Mod-Sev)
      1. Making sure Chromebooks are accessible to all languages (EL and Sped Focus) providing instruction 
      2. Increased Chromebooks and Hotspots (CUHSD Supported)
      3. Provide students support technology tools (mice, cables, power cords etc.) if they have physical accessibility needs.
    3. Ensure that students have the necessary assistive technology devices per their IEP (Mod-Sev)

  1. Access to Instruction that Facilitates Learning Skills Targeted in the Core Curriculum
    1. Project-Based Learning 
    2. Co-Teaching Approach (Mild-Mod/Gen Ed)
    3. Universal Design for Learning (Mild-Mod/Mod-Sev/Gen Ed)
    4. Differentiated Instruction (Mild-Mod/Mod-Sev/Gen Ed)
    5. Flipped Instruction (Homework, Assignments, Projects completed outside of class instructional time as much as possible)
    6. Must have live class instruction at least 50% of the time 
    7. Recording class sessions for the purpose of ensuring access for all students.
    8. Ensure individual tutoring time with teacher/aide/case manager 
      1. Set-up tutoring time with every gen ed teacher on student’s schedule. Specifically, students with IEPs should have a set time and opportunity to meet with their case manager on a weekly basis for a check-in. For example, there could be a “Case Manger Monday” tutorial where case managers would be expected to hold time for students on their caseloads to check in and review progress. 
    9. Set deadlines and expectations for completion of assignments that are aligned with Grading AR.

    1. Ensure online safety for students utilizing online instruction
      1. Monitoring students actions in class
      2. There should be clear expectations and examples of what constitutes safe online behavior, as well as respectful online classroom interactions and participation (especially when working in breakout rooms, etc.). 
      3. Ensuring student safety from harassment by students
      4. Recording class sessions for the purpose of overall safety. This recommendation is meant to address student safety and accountability when working independently and unsupervised in a break out room.  There would need to be special consideration for the legality of recording class sessions. Additionally, this recommendation is meant for all students, not just students in special education. 
    2. Implement instructional accommodations consistently per student’s IEP.
      1. Reinforce and assure that IEP accommodations are being utilized by student and offered by teacher.
  1. Access to Gen Ed Peers 
    1. Sped students accessing general ed virtual classes just like school were open. (Mild-Mod/Mod-Sev/Gen Ed)
    2. Creation of a student e-lounge where students are welcome to stop by and post an update on what they are doing (Mild-Mod/Mod-Sev/Gen Ed). Ideally there would be an “e-lounge” or homework center type space for teachers to provide additional academic support to students on a voluntary basis. 
      1. Supervision of proposed E-Lounge by teacher
    3. Schedule of Best Buddies activities virtually (Mod/Sev)
  2. Access to Supports Necessary to Access the Core Curriculum
    1. Ensure that accommodations per student’s IEP or 504 are implemented (Mild-Mod/Mod-Sev). It is recommended that a list of accommodations can be created as a reference point for case managers, and counselors to use. 
    2. Develop new accommodations as necessary to support learning in the general education setting. It is recommended that a common digital space is created for case managers to access where they can share ideas for new accommodations, so that they can be inspired by what others around the District are doing. An example could be a link on the staff portal for each department. 
    3. Routine feedback from teachers and support staff to reinforce learning and determine progress on goals (Mild-Mod/Mod-Sev)
    4. Re-Allocation of required chaperone duties, in the case of distance learning, to be used for check-in support. It is recommended that should distance learning continue next year chaperone duties could be adjusted/reallocated to accommodate the creation of additional learning supports and spaces for students that are staffed by teachers. 
    5. Creation of formula to develop in class study groups that balance the needs of all sped students. It is recommended that teachers take careful consideration when splitting students into small learning groups within their classrooms, and that thought is given to students' abilities to learn independently in a break out room or study session without teacher direction. 
    6. Well-defined role of paraeducators during virtual learning*
      1. Data-Collection (Mild-Mod/Mod-Sev)
      2. Guided Practice after the introduction of a new lesson by the teacher (Mild-Mod/Mod-Sev)
      3. Develop materials for the virtual classroom (Mild-Mod/Mod-Sev)
      4. Reinforcement of Skills: provide remedial instruction, reteach previously taught skills (Mild-Mod/Mod-Sev)
      5. Work with students in small groups or individual (Mild-Mod/Mod-Sev)
    7. Provide equipment and training to SLPS and School Psychologists to deliver teletherapy/Tele counseling (Mild-Mod/Mod-Sev)*
    8. Provide training to para-professionals on supporting students in a distance learning environment.
    9. Ensure that DIS (Designated Instructional Supports) services are embedded in the on-going virtual classroom schedule (Mild-Mod/Mod-Sev)*
    10. Provide training for teachers on conducting on-line instruction (Mild-Mod/Mod-Sev)
    11. Create resources for parents in order for students to access virtual learning.
      1. Provide behavioral consultation to parents of students with challenging behaviors by the school psychologist (Mild-Mod/Mod-Sev)
      2. Support for Sped parents to instruct and support  their student’s learning 
      3. Supporting parents and students in establishing routines at home that would allow for students to get work done
        1. Routine sleeping and eating patterns 
        2. Transition
        3. Family
        4. Medication
        5. Social Emotional Support
        6. Organization
      4. Provide tech consultation to parents who have difficulty supporting students with tech use. Make sure that the tech hotline is prepared to support the specialized digital tools that some students with IEPs access and require. 
      5. Common communication format for parents/guardians. Keep communication between parents in a consistent format, and try to avoid requiring parents and students to use an overwhelming number of communication systems. 
        1. Email
        2. Text
        3. Phone Call
        4. School Loop

  1. Access to District Support
    1. Policy of limitations of external testing
    2. Clear guidance and updates on changes to services and supports for students and instruction
    3. Maintenance of consistent schedule
      1. Yearly
      2. Weekly

  • Operations/Procedures
      1. Procedure for checking in with students with IEPs within the first 30 days of school if they failed or received an incomplete in a class in spring 2020. Both the counselor and the case manager should be involved in assessing the student’s transcript, progress towrads graduation, and developing a plan to address the F/I. 
      2. Procedures for remote/hybrid IEP coordination and completion
        1. Have a clear procedure identified and defined for remote/hybrid IEP coordination and completion which clearly defines the roles and responsibilities of all IEP team members (administrators, special education teachers, general education teachers, related services providers, parents, and students). 
        2. For special education teacher consider detailed instructions and guides for maintaining IEP documents remotely on a digital platform
          1. Consider pushing out weekly or monthly video updates that can be kept in a “digital library” for teachers to access and reference as needed
          2. Create a hub or shared space where all items can be stored for quick reference and easy access
        3. The District Office will maintain continued contact with special education department chairs and other departments, administrators, etc. as needed regarding vital updates that require more in depth coverage
      3. Clear communication expectations and protocols regarding CDE/Federal compliance linked on the Staff Portal and updated regularly
        1. Condense compliance updates from CDE and the Department of Ed into easy to understand, and quick reference documents.
          1. Organize the way that these are communicated into consistent and predictable communications so as to avoid email fatigue. For example, consider publishing a weekly email blast (1 time a week). 
        2. Weekly compliance updates from DO office regarding open IEPs
        3. DO office hours for teachers and administrators to check-in as needed or case students and situations. 
      4. Clear procedure for mental health referrals, and measuring student wellbeing
        1. Develop a decision tree for both staff and students to access when looking for mental health supports. Students should be able to begin the school year with a clear idea of who the mental health providers are available to them, and how to contact them. 
          1. Staff and admin should be aware of the continuum of supports and services available to all students, and how to make a referral for mental health services during remote/hybrid learning. 
          2. Contacts should be provided in a streamlined and easily accessible way. 
        2. Consider expanding the Mental Health First Aid training for additional staff
      5. Develop procedures for remote intervention for non-attenders, and/or students who are missing
        1. There should be special consideration for students with special needs who are struggling to attend remote sessions, or complete remote/hybrid assignments. 
          1. A clear and uniform process should be implemented across school sites to regularly identify and track students who are not attending school, or suddenly stop attending school. 
          2. A tiered system of support should be developed and implemented in reaching out to these students and families to ensure educational access and benefit. 
          3. Detailed accounts of all supports and interventions provided should be maintained in Aeries and in the case 
        2. Protocols should be developed for how to get in touch with hard to reach parents to get them to participate in IEPs. Additionally, there should be a checklist developed for what to do with IEPs that remain open due to a lack of parent participation. 
      6. Defining roles of related service providers, and expectations for remote/hybrid related service provision, and paraeducators
        1. Related service providers should have a clear idea of what their roles and responsibilities are during remote/hybrid learning
        2. For providers delivering services remotely the following should take place:
          1. At the beginning of the year all providers should be trained in remote service delivery and assessment administration
          2. Opportunities should be provided to these relate service providers to access trainings (internal or external if necessary) in order to fulfill the above
          3. Clear expectations and procedures should be implemented for all service providers regarding service logs, and communication logs
          4. Clear guidance needs to be given in an easily referenced document that outlines the legal and ethical expectations of remote/hybrid service provision
        3. Paraeducators should have their roles and responsibilities clearly defined
          1. The department chair, site admin, and school psychologist should work together to identify the most effective placement and use of the paraeducator during multiple scenarios (remote learning, hybrid learning, in person learning), and should develop a schedule for each scenario in the event that a quick shift is required. 
          2. Related service providers should have structured opportunities for professional development in order to better participate in remote/hybrid learning

Community Engagement

Subcommittee Members: Sarah Foy, Dianne Leo, Paul Pinza, Sharon Ortegon and Nathalie Goricanec


Subcommittee Goal


The recommendation from the Community Engagement subcommittee outlines core communication and community engagement goals and strategies to reach all stakeholders to ensure the full CUHSD community remains informed and a part of the planning process during the summer and next school year.


Summary of Recommendations


Regular communication with all stakeholders - With the 2019-2020 academic school year coming to a close with so many unknowns of what next school year could look like,  it is important to maintain communication and engagement with stakeholders during the summer and into the following school year.  Teachers and staff understand that difficult decisions must be made, but they need to be made as quickly as possible for everyone to plan for a successful reopening of our schools.  Communication is key especially when we are rolling out so many changes.  


Goals Established by Community Engagement Subcommittee:

  • Maintain communication and engagement with all stakeholders over the summer
  • Ensure all stakeholders have an opportunity to provide input to inform decisions
  • Establish outreach strategies that target specific demographics or communities such as the multilingual, non-digital households and Special Education families
  • Utilize multiple platforms and communication tools to ensure all stakeholders receive information 
  • Establish key information to include in future communications 
  • Clarify who is providing communication at the site vs. District Office vs. teachers

Stakeholder Groups:

  • Students
  • Support staff
  • Teachers
  • Administrators
  • Parents
    • Targeted messages for families that are typically harder to reach. Some examples:
      • Multilingual households
      • Non-digital households
      • Special Education families

Key Communicators

  • Superintendent
    • Provides communication with overview and high-level plans
  • Principals
    • Provides site-specific logistical communication following District-wide communication 

If tentative plans or recommendations require principals to create logistical plans for their schools, principals should work with their sites to prepare their site-specific plans  prior to the District communicating plans broadly. Once District communication is shared broadly with stakeholders, then principals will send their site-specific communication within a two week period. 


Targeted Messengers (site-specific)


Principals organize communication teams at their site that may include the following (3-5 staff member or parent team):

  • Counselor or designated administrator
  • Community Liaisons
  • Padres Unidos leaders
  • ELAC leaders
  • Bilingual Aides
  • Case Managers (will be added when school begins in August)

Principals will establish and communicate with this team before the start of school. 


Other possible communicators for reinforcing messages

  • Teachers to students and parents
  • Daily bulletins or students newspapers
  • ASB social media accounts
  • School and District Websites

Communication Platforms: 

All stakeholders: 

Primary: Schoolmessenger (email) 

Secondary: Remind, social media, website


Targeted stakeholders (multilingual families): 

Primary: robocalls and remind

Secondary: school site targeted messengers


Key information regarding the start of school will also be mailed out via a welcome letter from the school sites. 


Communication Strategies


All Stakeholders:

Provide communication on updates or opportunities for community input through the following methods:

  • Newsletters (District Office Staff weekly during the summer and Community monthly; Principals weekly)
  • Individual message emails from Superintendent and/or principals
    • Staff/Teachers: Superintendent or district staff inform or work with unions before communicating decisions or plans 
  • Text message updates 
    • Remind 
    • School Messenger
  • Mail (welcome letter with overview message from Dr. Bravo and site materials)
  • Robocalls 
    • Set up a day of the week for district updates, another for principal message to ensure there is no overlap
  • Video messages from Superintendent 
    • Share URL via email, social media and remind/SchoolMessenger messages

For targeted households: (e.g. multilingual, non-digital, and/or students with disabilities) 

Provide communication on updates or opportunities for community input through the following methods:

  • Robocalls in Spanish and English
  • Remind messages in Spanish and English
  • Mail (welcome letter with overview message from Dr. Bravo and site materials)
  • Site team of targeted messengers:
    • A counselor or a designated administrator
    • Community Liaisons
    • Padres Unidos leaders
    • ELAC leaders
    • Bilingual Aides
    • Case Managers (will be added when school begins in August)

Each parent is given 3-5 additional staff or parents to call for follow up or ask questions. This team will also work to follow up with these families to ensure they received communication and understand what it means for them. 


Community Engagement/Input Strategies


All stakeholders:

  • Surveys shared via remind, text message and email
    • Robocall reminder about survey
  • CUHSD webpage dedicated to updates or opportunities for engagement
    • Recommendations or plans from reopening steering committee
    • Google form for additional input to consider
    • Archived messages
  • Social Media
    • Instagram/Facebook live Q&A
    • Instagram story questions   

For multilingual and/or non-digital households:

  • A survey given over the phone and recorded on digital form. 
    • Add an item in the survey to indicate whether they can be reached by phone or online. 

Key Items to Include in Future Messaging

  • Set of clear assumptions (what are we basing plans on)
  • Clarify timeline from community input to communications (how we came to these decisions and how community input was utilized in the decision-making process)
  • Where to direct input
    • Identify a point person to share input with (principal, superintendent, coordinator of community engagement, etc.)
    • Share info@cuhsd.org email for additional input 
    • Share Google Form (when applicable) for additional feedback.

Student Services and Operations

Subcommittee members: Abra Evanoff, Melissa Fales, Teresa Wagster, Sharon Ortegon, Cathie Watson-Short, Lindsay Schubert, Rick Hayashi, Landon Jacobs, Jeff Bengford, Mike Posey, Kerry Murphy, Justin Ponzio, Denise Stephenson, Jen Sorkin, Courtney Schembri, Laura Saldaña, Kim Bartel, Stacey Chase, Christina Hillman, 

and Marita Beard


Subcommittee Goal
 

To facilitate the re-opening of all school sites in a way that is cohesive, efficient and safe for all stakeholders while still maintaining the important work of supporting community and culture for our students.


Summary of Recommendations 


504 Implementation and Monitoring - Ensure that 504 procedures account for possible digital revision and implementation should future school shutdowns due to shelter-in-place occur. 


Discipline processes and procedures - Revise disciplinary procedures to account for CDE and CDC guidelines and recommendations surrounding social distancing, and proper hygiene. Ensure that the student handbook, new student and parent orientations, and teacher professional development include an update on any new discipline process and procedures as they apply to remote/hybrid learning. 


Sports and athletics - Follow CCS and CIF recommendations as they apply to various closure scenarios. Make sure there is close consideration of the use of facilities throughout various closure scenarios, and be mindful of the fact that sports seasons may be moved or canceled depending on the state of the pandemic. 


Attendance policies and procedures - Account for flexible attendance taking during remote/hybrid instruction. Clearly communicate to students, families, and staff attendance expectations and guidelines. Consider positive-based attendance as a flexible option.


Extra-curricular activities - Extra-curricular activities should have a plan in place to transition to a remote platform should schools be required to shift to remote learning or a hybrid model. 


Links to Additional Documentation

Discipline

Athletics

Attendance

Extra-Curricular


Scenario 1 - No pandemic, all is well and no restrictions

    1. 504’s
      1. Families have the option of holding 504 meetings with the teachers and counselors in a virtual meeting space (in Zoom).
      2. 504’s are being transitioned to the 504 module in SIRAS, which is the Special Education Management System utilized for IEP’s. New 504 requests were being moved to this platform prior to the SIP. 
      1. Counselors will hold 504 meetings as normal. Prior to their annual review date counselors send letters home to all families of students who have a 504 Plan asking if they would like to continue with the accommodations as they currently are or would like to adjust them. Counselors send letters home /contact  all incoming 9th graders who have a 504 Plan to schedule a meeting within the first six weeks to review the accommodations and meet the teachers. The letters should provide documentation of supports and services that were implemented during the SIP in the Spring of 2020, in addition to an offer to discuss any student concerns that have arisen out of the Spring 2020 SIP for the student and family. While not all meetings for freshman 504 can take place in the first 6 weeks the initial contact should be made and parent feedback made available to teachers. Actual meetings should be held in accordance with the review dates if requested. Teachers are provided with hard and electronic copies of each 504 Plan for the students they have on their rosters in one database. Meetings can occur in person while following social distancing protocols. 

    1. Discipline
      1. Coordinate with the Technology Department to ensure all students have internet access.
      2. Create an online referral system to communicate with teachers.
      3. Site admin teams should identify students and families in need based on missing assignments and attendance.  Working with teachers and other support staff, families and students should be called or met with to provide resources. 
      1. APs create their annual in-person presentation along with a video to review the annual student expectations, specific guidance from the CDE, and expectations for online course participation. APs will work with District staff to create those expectations and provide training and support for APs and school staff. 
      2. APs and admin will coordinate supervision ensuring any Order from the Health Officer of Santa Clara County regarding social distancing, etc. 
      3. Enforce all Education Code violations as stated in each site’s Student Handbook, and amend Student Handbooks to include Social Distancing Guidelines and consequences for failure to adhere to those guidelines, as established by any Order from the Health Officer of Santa Clara County. Additions pertaining to social distancing guidelines will be communicated to families and students via multiple platforms: 
    2. Athletics 
      1. Provide training for coaches, athletes, staff & administrators according to new guidelines, including training for supervising admin, communicate additional restrictions to fans via email, parent meetings, social media and posted signs at games/contests.
      2. Give off-campus coaches CUHSD emails so they can utilize tools like Google Classroom, Zoom, etc. This will help parents feel secure that appropriate communication tools are being used.
    3. Attendance
      1. Traditional attendance. No change. District will continue to work with directives from the Santa Clara County Office of Education and District Attorney’s Office regarding attendance and truancy guidelines, if they were to change due to families wishing to have their students’ absences excused due to the pandemic after effect. 
      2. Coordinate with the Technology Department to ensure all students have internet access.
      3. Create an online behavioral referral system to communicate with teachers.
      4. Identify students/families in need and provide resources through outreach and student and staff feedback/data/information.
    4. Extra Curricular
      1. Added preventative measures for maintaining health according to local and CDC guidelines. Consider more use of outdoor spaces.
      2. Rallies will be held outdoors with more spacing, utilizing the bowls instead of the gyms. Outdoor projections for movies could be implemented as an event, with spacing marked accordingly on the field, as some cities have done at their public parks. Handouts would be eliminated (candy, t-shirts, ect.). It is recommended that site administrators will monitor and supervise the social distancing protocols in place via the Health Officer of Santa Clara County. 
      3. Lunch time rallies in the quad may continue, but with the protocol noted above. 
      4. Clubs will hold meetings outdoors, in gym/cafeteria or in large classrooms to ensure social distancing depending on the number of club members.

Scenario 2 - Fluctuating pandemic, temporary closures once or more during the year

    1. 504s
      1. Refer to Scenario 1 

    1. Discipline
      1. Follow California Department of Education (CDE) guidelines, as usual and as they may shift and provide guidance for online course participation and expectations for students. 
      2. APs create their annual ‘in person’ presentation along with a  video presentation to review the annual student expectations, and provide specific guidance from the CDE, expectations for online course behavior and participation to include in said presentations. APs will work with District staff to create those expectations and provide training and support for APs and school staff. 
      3. Enforce all Education Code violations as stated in each site’s Student Handbook, and amend Student Handbooks to include Social Distancing Guidelines and consequences for failure to adhere to those guidelines, as established by any Order from the Health Officer of Santa Clara County. Additions pertaining to expectations for online course behavior and participation and social distancing guidelines,will be communicated to families and students via multiple platforms: Principal messages, School Loop, site websites, messenger, etc. 
      4. Coordinate with IT to ensure all students have internet access.
      5. Create an online behavior referral system to communicate with teachers.
      6. Identify students/families in need and provide resources.

    1. Athletics
      1. Utilize cleared parent volunteers to help with this process (volunteer to monitor the water bottle refill station, sanitize as needed).
      1. Possible shortened seasons, or move seasons to other parts of the year in accordance with CIF/CCS guidance.
      2. Reschedule any cancelled/postponed athletic events if possible.
      3. Will need to address conflicts for students/athletes that are multi-sport athletes (football & basketball athletes may have to choose which sport to play if both are the same season).
      4. Address facility challenges (football and soccer both needing practice and contest space). May need to utilize outdoor space for indoor sports or indoor space for outdoor sports as necessary.
      5. Give off-campus coaches CUHSD emails so they can utilize tools like Google Classroom, Zoom, etc.  Will help parents feel secure that appropriate communication tools are being used.
      6. When school begins to re-open use Phase 1 of the NFHS Guidelines as a template for restarting sports in conjunction with county and state health agency guidelines and mandates.
      7. Provide training for coaches, athletes, staff & administrators according to new guidelines, including training for supervising admin, communicate additional restrictions to fans.
      8. Consider the possibility of holding virtual tryouts and team selections.
      9. Follow all existing direction and restrictions set by governing bodies.
      10. Invest in NFHS Pixelott camera systems to be able to broadcast games for fans at home.
    2. Attendance
      1. Utilizing attendance in this manner would also inform parents if their students were actually attending classes or not. Sites will work with District and site staff to explore other ways to notify parents of non participation on “positive attendance/online course” days. 
      1. Traditional attendance while on campus, no change. District would continue to work with and monitor directives from the Santa Clara County Office of Education and District Attorney’s Office re: attendance and truancy guidelines, if they were to change due to families wishing to have their students’ absences excused due to the Pandemic after effect. 
      2. The shift would be made to positive-based attendance while in distance learning for those students on that schedule, on that given day. 
      3. Coordinate with the Technology Departmentto ensure all students have internet access.
      4. Create an online referral system to communicate with teachers.
      5. Identify students/families in need and provide resources via weekly queries of students who have not participated online/actual calling sections of the alphabet, with the work divided amongst the site admin teams. 

    1. Extra Curricular

      1. Activity Directors will continue to utilize various online tools for games, events, and other activities. They will take the lead in providing guidance to club advisors, and those working to support activities, on new platforms and new ideas. 
      2. Rallies could be pre-recorded and shared online, in the same model that virtual ceremonies are produced and then shared out at a specific time on a specific date. 
      3. All clubs and paperwork will move to a digital platform in the event of school closures (have clubs set up online protocols before school closures).
      4. All clubs will set up a Google Classroom and Remind account (Activity Directors will make a Master Dashboard of all clubs with add codes in case students want to join; managed by Activity Directors). 
      5. All students will be asked to add all school social media channels so they can stay up to date digitally. This will be done utilizing School Messenger, School Loop and district and site social media accounts. 
      6. While we are in school, rules from Scenario 1 apply. 

Scenario 3 - Continued pandemic, shifts of 50% students on campus at a time

    1. 504s
      1. Counselors will hold 504 meetings via Zoom. Prior to their annual review date counselors send letters home to all families of students who have a 504 Plan asking if they would like to continue with the accommodations as they currently are or would like to adjust them. Counselors send letters home /contact all incoming 9th graders who have a 504 Plan scheduling a meeting within the first six weeks to review the accommodations and meet the teachers. The letters should provide documentation of supports and services that were implemented during the SIP in the Spring of 2020, in addition to an offer to discuss any student concerns that have arisen out of the Spring 2020 SIP for the student and family. While not all meetings for freshman 504 can take place in the first 6 weeks the initial contact should be made and parent feedback made available to teachers. Actual meetings should be held in accordance with the review dates if requested and will be held via Zoom. Teachers  are provided with hard and electronic copies of each 504 Plan for the students they have on their rosters in one database.  
      2. 504s are being transitioned to the 504 module in SIRAS, which is the Special Education Management System utilized for IEP’s. New 504 requests were being moved to this platform prior to the SIP. 
    2. Discipline
      1. Follow California Department of Education (CDE) guidelines, as usual and as they may shift and provide guidance for online course participation and expectations for students. 
      2. APs create a video presentation to review the annual student expectations, and provide specific guidance from the CDE, expectations for online course participation to include in said presentations. APs will work with District staff to create those expectations and provide training and support for APs and school staff.  
      3. Enforce all Education Code violations as stated in each site’s Student Handbook, and amend Student Handbooks to include Social Distancing Guidelines and consequences for failure to adhere to those guidelines, as established by any Order from the Health Officer of Santa Clara County to have that information available as situations are fluid, regardless of being in a total shut down or not. Additions pertaining to expectations and social distancing guidelines and online course behavior and expectations will be communicated to families and students via multiple platforms: principal messages, School Loop, site websites, messenger, etc. 
      4. Create an “Attendance and Discipline” web page that is hosted by the District site as well as the school sites’ web pages; the purpose is to regularly communicate and discuss issues that need to be addressed connected to the expectations set forth regarding online coursework and behavior and adjust to forthcoming guidance form the CDE. (Ex: an increase in Zoombombing, plagiarism, recording, etc).
      5. Coordinate with the Technology Department to ensure all students have internet access.
      6. Create an online referral system to communicate with teachers.
      7. Identify students/families in need and provide resources via weekly queries of students who have not participated online/actual calling sections of the alphabet, with the work divided amongst the site admin teams. 
    3. Athletics
      1. How the shifts of 50% students are set up would help determine which phase of the NFHS Guidelines would be appropriate to begin with
      1. Establish tech support team of trained volunteers to operate the video broadcast system
      1. Use the appropriate phase of the NFHS Guidelines as a template for restarting sports along with the guidelines and requirements of county and state health agencies.
      2. Limit access to the rest of campus (non-athletic facilities, locker rooms, etc) once practice and contests begin after school
      3. Consider possibility of holding virtual tryouts and team selections
      4. Invest in NFHS Pixelott camera systems to be able to broadcast games for fans at home
    4. Attendance
      1. Utilizing attendance in this manner would also inform parents if their students were actually attending classes or not. Sites will work with District and site staff to explore other ways to notify parents of non participation on “positive attendance/online course” days. 
      1. Traditional attendance while on campus, no change. District would continue to work with and monitor directives from the Santa Clara County Office of Education and District Attorney’s Office re: attendance and truancy guidelines, if they were to change due to families wishing to have their students’ absences excused due to the Pandemic after effect. 
      2. The shift would be made to positive based attendance while in distance learning for those students on that schedule, on that given day. While in distance learning  attendance can be marked twice per week. Once for live, online courses  and a second time for positive feedback like office hours, turning in assignments or communication with teachers via email. 
      3. Coordinate with IT to ensure all students have internet access.
      4. Create an online referral system to communicate with teachers.
      5. Identify students/families in need and provide resources via weekly queries of students who have not participated online/actual calling sections of the alphabet, with the work divided amongst the site admin teams. 
    5. Extra Curricular
      1. Refer to Scenario 2

Scenario 4 - Continued pandemic, limited students/staff allowed on campus

    1. 504s
      1. Counselors will hold 504 meetings via zoom. Prior to their annual review date counselors send letters home to all families of students who have a 504 Plan asking if they would like to continue with the accommodations as they currently are or would like to adjust them. Counselors send letters home /contact  all incoming 9th graders who have a 504 Plan scheduling a meeting within the first six weeks to review the accommodations and meet the teachers. The letters should provide documentation of supports and services that were implemented during the SIP in the Spring of 2020, in addition to an offer to discuss any student concerns that have arisen out of the Spring 2020 SIP for the student and family. While not all meetings for freshman 504 can take place in the first 6 weeks the initial contact should be made and parent feedback made available to teachers. Actual meetings should be held in accordance with the review dates if requested and will, again, be held via zoom. Teachers  are provided with hard and electronic copies of each 504 Plan for the students they have on their rosters in one database.  
      2. 504’s are being transitioned to the 504 module in SIRAS, which is the Special Education Management System utilized for IEP’s. New 504 requests were being moved to this platform prior to the SIP.
    2. Discipline
      1. Follow California Department of Education (CDE)  guidelines, as usual and as they may shift and provide guidance for online course participation and expectations for students. 
      2. APs create a video presentation to review the annual student expectations, and create, if not provided specific guidance from the CDE, expectations for online course participation to include in said presentations. AP’s will work with District staff to create those expectations and provide training and support for AP’s and school staff.  
      3. Enforce all Education Code violations as stated in each site’s Student Handbook, and amend Student Handbooks to include Social Distancing Guidelines and consequences for failure to adhere to those guidelines, as established by any Order from the Health Officer of Santa Clara County to have that information available as situations are fluid, regardless of being in a total shut down or not. Additions pertaining to expectations and social distancing guidelines and online course behavior and expectations will be communicated to families and students via multiple platforms: Principal messages, School Loop, site websites, messenger, etc. 
      4. Create an “Attendance and Discipline” web page that is hosted by the District site as well as the school sites’ web pages; the purpose is to regularly communicate and discuss issues that need to be addressed connected to the expectations set forth re: online coursework and behavior and adjust to forthcoming guidance form the CDE (California Department of Education). (Ex: an increase in Zoombombing, plagiarism, recording, etc).
      5. Coordinate with IT to ensure all students have internet access.
      6. Create an online referral system to communicate with teachers.
      7. Identify students/families in need and provide resources via weekly queries of students who have not participated online/actual calling sections of the alphabet, with the work divided amongst the site admin teams.
    3. Athletics
      1. The details of this scenario would determine the appropriate measures and/or appropriate phase of NFHS Guidelines along with the guidelines and requirements of county and state health agencies.
      1. Refer to Scenario 3.  
    4. Attendance
      1. Refer to Scenario 3

    1. Extra Curricular
      1. Refer to Scenario 2


Scenario 5 - Continued pandemic, current sheltering restrictions

    1. 504’s
      1. Counselors will hold 504 meetings via zoom. Prior to their annual review date counselors send letters home to all families of students who have a 504 Plan asking if they would like to continue with the accommodations as they currently are or would like to adjust them. Counselors send letters home /contact  all incoming 9th graders who have a 504 Plan scheduling a meeting within the first six weeks to review the accommodations and meet the teachers. The letters should provide documentation of supports and services that were implemented during the SIP in the Spring of 2020, in addition to an offer to discuss any student concerns that have arisen out of the Spring 2020 SIP for the student and family. While not all meetings for freshman 504 can take place in the first 6 weeks the initial contact should be made and parent feedback made available to teachers. Actual meetings should be held in accordance with the review dates if requested and will, again, be held via zoom. Teachers  are provided with hard and electronic copies of each 504 Plan for the students they have on their rosters in one database.  
      2. 504’s are being transitioned to the 504 module in SIRAS, which is the Special Education Management System utilized for IEP’s. New 504 requests were being moved to this platform prior to the SIP. 
    2. Discipline
      1. Refer to Scenario 4
    3. Athletics
      1. What priority is given for which sports get to return? This could be a potential equity issue.
      1. Once sports restart coaches will need to check in with athletes to gauge their fitness level and need to restart conditioning 
      1. If Scenario 2 is put into place after Scenario 5 there is a chance of possible shortened seasons, or move seasons to other parts of the year (winter and/or spring) in accordance with CIF/CCS guidance
      2. Give off-campus coaches CUHSD emails so they can utilize tools like Google Classroom, Zoom, etc
      3. Investigate alternative fundraising options
      4. Following guidelines set up by the CIF and NFHS, and along with the guidelines and requirements of county and state health agencies, look at holding sports when possible even if only a small percentage or no of students are on campus during the day.
    4. Attendance
      1. See scenario 3
    5. Extra Curricular
      1. Refer to Scenario 2

Extra Documentation Discipline: It should be noted that ALL guidelines by non-governmental agencies, or even federal government agencies should be aligned with the local guidelines and requirements of city, county and state health agencies as to not supersede the lawful local jurisdictions and evolving demands. 


Discipline shall use a 3 option system.

All students will follow the same rules, policies, and expectations as listed in the student handbook.

We shall stress the “nexus” between how behavior off campus can affect discipline by school officials.


Option #1: Face-to-Face instruction: Students are on campus adhering to CDC guidelines.


Option#2: Distance learning: Students work from home and participate in class with audio and video.


Option#3: Distance learning under referral: Students who repeatedly violate Ed. Code will need a parent Zoom meeting or phone call depending on preference of parent. After the Zoom meeting, it will be determined if the student receives the academic work during tutorial time or if the student is able to attend virtual class with video and audio off. Another intervention would be for parents to sign their student into the class and supervise their child. It will be determined when the student is able to rejoin the class without restrictions. NOTE: Ed Code 48900(k) would most likely cover disruptions to the instructional process.


SAMPLE: CUHSD Behavior Expectations 

All school rules apply even in a remote setting. Students are expected to act in a manner appropriate for school when interacting with teachers, students and staff. 

 

It is important that students and teachers treat the online classroom as they would a regular, in-person classroom with the school-appropriate behavior, attire, backgrounds, language and interactions. Failure to do so may result in the following consequences: meetings with teachers, students, parents and administrators; referral to an assistant principal, alternate online platforms; and alternate assignments. 

 

Students may be subject to discipline for off-campus misconduct if the misconduct is related to school activity and causes or is reasonably likely to cause a substantial disruption to school activity. For example:  Ed Code 48900 (k) deals generally definiance and with disruption to school activities, where other Ed Codes deal with a student using technology may be disciplined for engaging in unlawful harassment or making threats against students, staff, or district property. This holds true even if the misconduct occurs off-campus and during non-school hours if the behavior causes or is reasonably likely to cause a substantial disruption to school activity. 

Students and families can refer to the District’s Board Policy on Student Use of Technology for additional information.


Sample from Del Mar linked here.


Sample Zoom Norms

THIS IS SCHOOL, SAME EXPECTATIONS/NORMS APPLY!

  1. Do not share class Zoom/Google Meet info with others - teacher will only admit students in our class.
  2. You must use your school Gmail account and your own full name (first and last).
  3. Your cameras should be turned on. (Having your camera on is optional, but it helps to be able to see you.)
  4. Your microphone will be muted by default.
  5. Keep yourself muted unless you would like to talk.
  6. Make sure your clothes/background are appropriate.

Consequences

Acting inappropriately includes, but is not limited to:

  • being disruptive, interrupting the instructor or others
  • using video inappropriately
  • being verbally inappropriate or using the chat inappropriately
  • posting or using inappropriate language or images
  • messing with your account photo or background video during class

Instructors may engage the following Consequences (dependant on the action):

  • Muting of student
  • Temporarily removing a student from a Zoom session (the instructor will not let you rejoin the class for the day)
  • Contacting the student’s parent/guardian 
  • Seek disciplinary action from school administration
  • Permanently removing access to Zoom in the future

Added note about Zoom: Some students show up as Guest even when in their CUSHD accounts. Teachers need a video or fix for this to give students so they can fix this authentication process for next year. If teachers are to keep their online classrooms secure we can only let in students who are authenticated and not guests. This must be a standard for safety. 


Extra Documentation Athletics

NFHS (National Federation of State High School Associations) GUIDANCE FOR OPENING UP HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETICS AND ACTIVITIES It should be noted that ALL guidelines by non-governmental agencies, or even federal government agencies should be aligned with the local guidelines and requirements of city, county and state health agencies as to not supersede the lawful local jurisdictions and evolving demands. 


For a quick summary of the guidelines, see Cheat Sheet.


Extra Considerations Attendance

Questions that we need more information about to form a cohesive and compliant  attendance policy.

What if a student finishes a 12 week course in 8 weeks? What does attendance look like then?


How are we communicating with parents in a non-traditional attendance situation?


What will the requirements be for daily attendance from the DOE/county?


A challenge for required daily attendance in classes for some students will be that they are not available during those times (i.e. if they are providing childcare to siblings or working outside the home) -- if the same restrictions continue in the Fall.


What will truancy look like and how will we follow the necessary steps of the SARB process?


Who will contact parents if a student isn’t showing up/ Teacher? AP?


Will schools/the district be responsible (legally) for students during the school day, as we are when school is in session?  If so, we will need to diligently track attendance and notify parents of absences.


Depending on DOE guidance, we might be legally responsible for students during the school day, even during distance learning. If so, we would need to keep track of daily attendance period and contact parent/guardian as usual.


Extra Documentation: Extra Curricular Activities


  • Seems like for each scenario, the options need to follow the formula “Option A - not have it, Option B - have it online/virtual, Option C - have it in person but socially distanced” for all things
  • Make an effort to move all activities digital (i.e. clubs) so that if and when we close school again, we have this in place and kids can easily access
  • We want to give ASB and clubs ownership if possible about how to plan events within the guidelines when we go back in August
  • Activities Directors could work as “gatekeepers” for groups (i.e. music) to approve or deny or work with other coaches/teachers to see if their event can work within the guidelines 
  • Work with athletics on their guidelines (from CIF, County, etc) to work within those same guidelines so things look similar 
  • Link to Westmont Performing Arts COVID Guidelines
  • Protocol for approval of ideas and events is important - Activities Directors can be the people who can help with this if groups have questions or ideas that may or may not meet the guidelines. 

Questions from Extra Curricular

  • Provide masks for those who need them (will all students need to wear daily? Who provides?)

If we have reusable masks, maybe have some sort of exchange program where dirty ones are dropped off and clean ones are given, then the dirty ones are washed/sanitized to be re-issued the next day/week/etc. This would have to be on a special case basis, not a school wide program.

Student and Staff Safety

Subcommittee members: Crystal Adams, Jason Miller, Leslie Tatsuta, Nancy Torres Pfeiffer, Veronica Ramirez, Debbie Phalen, Charlie Webster, Bobby Joe Stewart, and Rory McCarthy


Subcommittee Goal 


This subcommittee will consider the needs of all subgroups and stakeholders within the school community in order to ensure that all students and staff can stay safe when school reopens in the fall. 


Summary of Recommendations


Preparation and prevention - Ensure that sites have adequate supplies of basic first aid materials and that staff are trained on their use, sanitize all frequented facilities on a regular basis, and make adjustments as needed to food distribution. Revise site safety plans to include protocols for future outbreaks.


Limit site access as needed -  In the event of a continued or resurgent pandemic, reduce the number of students per class and limit access to the school site as needed. 


Ensure staff and students follow health protocols - Follow County Health and Safety Guidelines and provide updated guidelines as conditions change. Implement as needed the use of thermometers, masks, social distancing, handwashing and other health procedures and clarify their use to the full community of staff, families, and students.


Scenario 1 - No pandemic, all is well and no restrictions

Focus on preparation and prevention.

    1. Facilities
      1. Limit access and interactions in health office:
        1. Stock classrooms with basic first aid and train staff to administer.
        2. Consider moving the location of the health office to a space that is not frequented by visitors.
      2. Sanitize all classrooms, bathrooms, and other frequented facilities (i.e., cafeteria, outside seating areas, offices, locker room) nightly.
    2. Student Transportation
      1. Increase sanitization of vehicles between groups, if possible.
    3. Food Services
      1. Reconsider salad bar/buffet style stations.
      2. Provide training on proper sanitation for food service employees and student workers.
      3. Explore feasibility of multiple food service kiosks spread throughout campus, placed just outside classrooms. 
        1. Each kiosk serves 5-10 classrooms, with each one designated a specific outside area for eating, incorporating proper distancing. 
        2. Stagger scheduled service for each room. 
        3. Administrators supervise 2-3 areas that are near each other to prevent commingling of the classroom groups.
    4. Safety
      1. Revise site emergency plans, with specific focus on outbreaks/pandemic and possible implications of future need for social distancing on other types of emergency response. 
      2. Provide training for all staff on protocols for responding to the onset of symptoms during the school day. 
        1. Determine clear steps to follow, designate who is the appropriate person to respond, and who needs to be informed immediately (e.g., Director of Food Services, who has specific reporting and response expectations). 
      3. Provide a clear definition of clean vs. sanitized. Sanitization is the only thing that kills the virus.
    5. Physical Health
      1. Stock classroom first aid kits to minimize unnecessary health office traffic.
      2. Train students and staff on healthy practices to avoid the spread of germs (i.e., handwashing, using tissues properly, staying home when sick, etc.).
    6. Contingencies for students and staff with underlying health conditions 
      1. Consider precautions, in addition to all wearing masks and recommended PPE, such as distance learning/teaching options, if necessary, and with support.

Scenario 2 - Fluctuating pandemic, temporary closures once or more during the year

Assumptions: social distancing protocols and requirements for masks, etc., will be expected.

    1. Facilities
      1. Limit access and interactions in health office:
        1. Stock classrooms with basic first aid and train staff to administer
        2. Consider moving location of health office to a space that is not frequented by visitors
        3. Provide separate isolation room
        4. Install plastic barriers in the health office to protect staff working there
      2. Sanitize bathrooms frequently throughout the school day
      3. Provide multiple handwashing stations throughout campus
      4. Schedule students to use locker rooms in shifts to change clothes, or stagger lockers and student changing locations to allow for social distancing
      5. Cafeteria
        1. Space students at tables (mark them with an x)
        2. Allow for lunch in classrooms (who will supervise?)
        3. Create outdoor eating spaces with social distancing
        4. Consider using foggers after all students are out (assuming we have 1 per campus). 
      6. Classrooms
        1. Limit class size to incorporate social distancing protocols.
          1. The average number of students per classroom is 11, with the assumption that furniture and movability concerns increase the distancing needed to 8x8 feet or 64 sq ft. This also assumes unused desks/chairs are stored in the classroom.
        2. Improve air quality inside buildings with installation of special filters needed to decrease time that virus stays in the air
        3. Limit the movement of students throughout the day to minimize exposure
        4. Sanitize all touch surfaces following each student shift, using wipes and spray (more effective than foggers in classroom spaces, which take 10-20 minutes to complete properly and a large amount of staff to complete the task in a short time). 
        5. Sanitize all rooms nightly.
          1. For a school with 4 custodians on night shift and 72 classrooms, it would require 9 hours to clean and disinfect just those classrooms (not including any other buildings, restrooms, or outdoor areas). Would require additional staffing to sanitize all classrooms on a campus each night
        1. Reduce number of students in each classroom. Only about ⅓ of current average class size can fit in a typical classroom if social distancing is required 
        2. Consider lab/collaborative groups and spacing within and between those groups 
        3. Make use of outdoor spaces, weather and space permitting
      1. Other office spaces and points of entry
        1. Install plastic barriers for any space where staff interact with the public
        2. Maintain one point of entry for all visitors
        1. Limit points of entry for all based on the number of staff and thermometers available if symptom screening is required
    1. Student Transportation
      1. Require physical distancing on district transportation - need to sit in every other seat.  Currently we can transport 127 students at a time, which matches the current number who need transportation.
      2. Prioritize special education students, who will be most impacted; possible routes have already been drafted to allow for this transport
      3. Clean and sanitize all vehicles between morning drop off and afternoon pick up
      4. Hire 2 additional van drivers.
      5. End district-provided transportation for use on school days for athletics, activities, field trips, etc.
      6. Consider limiting district transportation for groups on non-school days, as more busses will be needed to allow for physical distancing and this will increase the cost
    2. Food Services: Same as scenario 1, except
      1. Close down salad bar/buffet style serving stations
      2. Install plastic barriers between students/staff for protection on the serving line (estimated cost districtwide $10,000 - $15,000)
      3. Limit or eliminate student workers in the cafeteria (this will slow down the serving line and limit the student that can be served during lunch and breakfast)
      4. Reconfigure and expand the serving line, allowing 6 feet gaps between students (Consideration: who will supervise students in line)
    3. Safety
      1. The mandated reporter trainings should emphasize the change to students being at home during school hours and the challenges this will bring to many high risk groups of students.
      2. Develop clear protocols, responses, and supports for “missing” or disengaged students when students are not at school in person.
      3. If job duties are changed or shifted due to a full or partial school closure, staff needs to work with HR to ensure that all parties understand the shift.
      4. Provide training for all staff on how to communicate best with police, CPS, other supporting organizations to get appropriate help for students in need/crisis during pandemic.
      5. Continue relationships with CASSY and Uplift to respond to mental health needs and safety concerns
      6. Secure campuses when closed (may need additional support for this) 
      7. Revise emergency plans (i.e., virus infections, natural disasters, lockdown drills). For example:
        1. Revise gathering maps for evacuation to allow fewer people in a space
        1. Include physical distancing considerations when students are in lines, walking, or waiting for “all clear”
    1. Physical Health: Same as scenario 1, and
      1. Provide Personal Protective Equipment recommended by health organizations. Nurses provide training on proper PPE use.
        1. Mask specifics (what kind, and making them available)
        2. Gloves, when and how to use them
        3. Barriers
      2. Move receptionist desk closer to door and limit entry into physical spaces
      3. Consider establishing entry protocol for all:
        1. Asking questions regarding recent travel, exposure possibilities (Dr. Cody)
        2. Temperature and symptom checks, with documentation
          1. Challenges:
            1. Availability of thermometers. Currently each site has 1 infrared thermometer. 25 more have been ordered, but receiving them will be difficult with needs in hospitals. This is still only 4-5 more per site and not enough to do daily checking of 1000-2000 people. The state has promised thermometers, but not sure of arrival date
            2. Trained staff would be needed to administer these checks
            3. Location of documentation so that all can access if needed (Aeries?)
            1. Plan for responding to situations of student/family refusal to stay home when they have symptoms
      1. Limit exposure by:
        1. Avoiding split staff at different sites on the same day (e.g., a teacher teaches two periods at one school and then two periods at another school on the same day).
        2. Planning passing periods and other “free” times, including the use of one-way traffic and other clear travel paths as needed 
        3. Limit campus visitors to essential visitors only (e.g., college rep visits could be done virtually via zoom).
          1. Prioritize parents/guardians and other necessary individuals for 504, IEP, ELAST and other student support meetings. 
          2. Consider a separate meeting space near the point of entry for essential meetings and schedule so that there is time to sanitize.
      2. Establish and follow set protocols for persons potentially exposed, in keeping with published public health guidelines
    1. Contingencies for students and staff with underlying health conditions   
      1. Follow public health recommendations regarding required PPE, as well as equipment and modifications needed for at-risk individuals to be safe on campus
      2. Prepare for the possibility that HHI may become a more necessary option and will require changes to avoid exposure (i.e., teacher not going to student’s home)
      3. Request information very soon from staff who would be impacted so we can plan scheduling, facilities, staffing, etc.


Scenario 3 - Continued pandemic, shifts of 50% students on campus at a time

    1. Facilities: Same as scenario 2
    2. Student Transportation: Same as scenario 2, and
      1. Careful planning for Special Education students so that transportation is available when those students need to be on campus
    3. Food Services: Same as scenario 2, and
      1. Get food to students who are not on campus
        1. If waivers are provided/extended (current waivers are good through August)
          1. Delivery: use transportation between morning drop off and afternoon pick up to provide one or more days of meals at a time
          2. Drive by/pick up
        2. If no waiver provided
          1. Students must be on campus
      2. Bring food to students in classrooms. 
        1. Issues with staffing/supervision in classrooms (teacher duty free lunch).
        2. More possibilities for contamination in classrooms when students remove masks and eat
    4. Safety: Same as scenario 2, and
      1. Monitor gates and limit access to campus. 
        1. Continue to limit access to one point of entry for visitors during the school day. 
        2. We have the same amount of physical space to supervise, with less staff physically on campus to do so
        3. More students not on campus = more people possibly trying to get on campus to see their friends, bring them food, etc. 
      2. Lock down areas/facilities that are not in use
        1. Less area to be concerned about for safety/supervision
        2. Limits need to sanitize spaces not in use
    5. Physical Health: Same as scenario 2, and
      1. Consider that the schedule for bringing students to campus will impact the need for additional entrance protocols, etc. 
    6. Contingencies for students and staff with underlying health conditions: Same as scenario 2, and
      1. In hybrid models, staff who cannot be on campus can perform other duties (videos, planning, online teaching, phone calls to families, lining up supports for families/students, etc)


Scenario 4 - Continued pandemic, limited students/staff allowed on campus

    1. Facilities
      1. Limit access to only essential school facilities, and report any used facilities for sanitation 
      2. Turn off/unplug items not in use
    2. Student Transportation: Same as scenario 3
    3. Food Services: Same as scenario 3
    4. Safety: Same as scenario 3
    5. Physical Health: Same as scenario 3
    6. Contingencies for students and staff with underlying health conditions: Same as scenario 3

Scenario 5 - Continued pandemic, current sheltering restrictions

    1. Facilities: Same as scenario 4
    2. Student Transportation (N/A)
    3. Food Services: Same as scenario 3, except
      1. Not required to feed students but FRL students are still relying on meals. May still be able to if USDA provides waiver
    4. Safety: Same as scenario 3
    5. Physical Health
      1. Responsibility to teach about physical health remotely
      2. Disseminate information about testing availability and locations
    6. Contingencies for students and staff with underlying health conditions  (N/A)

Student and Staff Well-Being and Community

Subcommittee members: Cesar Cabrera-Contreras, Erika Miguel, German Cerda, Michael Espinoza, Kristie Geist, Amanda Davison, Kevin Nguyen, Eve Walton, Bari Sholomon, and Tessa Corona


Subcommittee Goal


To be proactive about the mental health of our staff and students during the several different scenarios that may be in place at the reopening of school in the 2020-21 school year. 


Summary of Recommendations


Mental health supports - Ensure that students continue to have access to mental health supports. Offer mental health training to all staff. Expand wellness centers to additional sites. Consider flexibility in school schedules of staff and students to reduce stress. 


Develop a multi-tiered system of support (MTSS) - Utilize the principles of MTSS to provide for a range of supports based on student need, including mental health services and interventions.


Structures for community-building - Culturally responsive communications in multiple languages. Use a buddy system to create a sense of community and belonging for incoming students. Promote virtual socialization opportunities for collaboration and relationship-building.


Recommendations


Recommendations that apply to all opening scenarios: 

    1. Mental Health/Well-Being
      1. To effectively address the varying social-emotional, and mental health/wellbeing needs of students and staff, all staff should receive training on social emotional learning (SEL), trauma informed practices, and/or healing-centered practices. 
        1. Create professional development for staff regarding typical developmental reactions to stress and trauma which may have resulted from home confinement.  Site-based mental health staff should be the point persons for delivering content, and if additional staff are needed contract with an outside organization. 
        2. Address other re-entry concerns (trauma, grief, etc.)
        3. Utilize the mental health and wellness resource page to provide support to students and families.
      2. The average counselor to student ratio at CUHSD is 400-500 students per counselor, while the American School Counselor Association (ASCA) recommended ratio is 250 to 1. It is imperative then that additional support staff positions (e.g. CASSY counselors, social workers, school psychologists, college & career specialists) are not cut/reduced, especially as the mental health needs of students are expected to rise as a result of this pandemic.   
      3. Create a Multi-Tiered System of Support (MTSS) that will serve to identify and serve the mental health/wellbeing of students by organizing effective resources (multi-tier mapping) and interventions so students get help early. Some of these interventions might require additional training for staff.
        1. For example, a Tier 1 intervention that supports all students’ mental health/wellbeing is consistency & structure--which is why minimizing the amount of different dashboards students navigate is key, as well as creating a schedule that reduces student confusion.
        2. Another Tier 1 intervention would be keeping in mind that the majority of students feel overwhelmed and stressed with the amount of school work and reducing the expected amount of homework per subject.
        3. Establish protocols, triage systems to utilize when a student needs more focused support (ie - shelter, food, therapy, what to do if a student is not attending, etc). This could be for Tier 2/Tier 3.
        4. Classroom interventions should also be included as part of this MTSS model for instance, consistency in classroom discipline, etc. 
      4. Help staff with their work-life balance and/or by providing time in their work schedule to plan, answer emails, etc. without the expectation that this will be done outside work hours. 
        1. Flexibility must be considered for both staff and students alike. For instance, some staff have children and thus are often not able to do scheduled synchronous classes. Furthermore, there are students who have multiple barriers at home which do not allow them to attend all synchronous classes at specific times. In both scenarios and many more, there should be flexibility in the allowance of extra time and space.
    2. Communication/interaction
      1. Too much or too little information can impact well-being. It is important that families and staff receive the necessary information, but not so much that it causes anxiety or disengagement. Utilize multiple platforms of communication with families, students and stakeholders to ensure access. 
        1. Online/cellular forms of communication/applications with phone call/text capabilities (such as Remind with student/parent contact information) have been effective (CUHSD surveys). 
        2. Utilize front office staff, community liaison, aides, counselors or other forms of communication for language barriers as needed. 
        3. Ensure that platforms work effectively with hotspots and chromebooks.
      2. Ensure that communication is timely, culturally responsive, and effective. Not all families have email. Not all families read English/Spanish. Consideration needs to be made for students and families who speak/ read a language other than English and/or have different learning abilities.
        1. Bring in a translation service that gives families a single point of contact and give teachers and staff flexibility in contacting.  
          1. For instance, Remind or Talking Points (as an alternative), is an app that translates messages between teachers and families in many different languages. Parents receive the messages as a text message and do not need to download an app. It's free for individuals and can be purchased for broader use by districts. Parents and students should receive information about how to sign up and how Remind works.
          2. This could also include recorded lectures/lessons for English Learners to review and for students who could benefit from that as well (for ex, students who work, etc.) to ensure all communication is clear.
      3. Inconsistency in routines and the introduction of new technology platforms increases student and family stress: utilization of a single platform for all teachers to post messages, assignments, directions, and correspondence in order to reduce the amount of stress that is currently being experienced from the multiple platforms being used now. 
      4. Training for students and families on how to use the platform (especially for new-comers). This could be incorporated into orientations done prior to school starting.
      5. Utilization of school-wide norms regarding when to post assignments, when to collect assignments, when to have assignments in the gradebook, how long to respond back to messages, and other clear work/home boundaries for students and staff alike. 
        1. Examples of these could look as such:
          1. Regarding posting and collecting assignments, ensure all students in all sections have an equal amount of time to complete assignments.
            1. For instance, if a teacher posts homework on Monday to one section which is due Wednesday (2 days time to complete), then their section on Tuesday should have until Thursday to complete the same assigned work if that work was posted on Tuesday.
          2. Department-based summative assessment schedule in which specific departments may deliver major assessments and/or collect major assignments on specific days in order to limit a flood of summative assessments due on the same day.
            1. For instance, Math and English departments deliver summative assessments/turn in major assignments on a set day, VAPA and Science have a set day, etc.
            2. See College Board AP Exam schedule for another example of what this could look like.
          3. Once an assignment is collected, the teacher will input the grade for that assignment no later than one month from the date of collection.
          4. It is recommended that teachers respond within 48 hours upon receiving emails or other types of messages, excluding the weekend in the 48 hour timeframe.
    3. Creating community and group identity
      1. Provide numerous opportunities throughout the semester for students, families, and school members to interact and hear each other’s ideas (need to do this in a culturally responsive way - not all families have the ability to do a google form, etc).
        1. This could include hybrid (virtual, in person) town hall meetings. 
        2. Existing parent groups, (e.g. PTSA, ELAC, DELAC) should be incorporated into this.

Scenario 1 - No pandemic, all is well and no restrictions

    1. Mental Health/Well-Being
      1. Gauge student and staff mental health/wellbeing via whole-school survey and/or by analyzing student work for mental health needs for follow-up/individual support as well as for those who are having issues readjusting.
      2. Expand Wellness Club or Centers to additional campuses
      3. Implement Wellness/Healthy Living curriculum/presentations via Advisory 
    2.  Communication/interaction
      1. Provide positive supervision, safe, and social supports/interactions. When problems arise during daily transitions, staff should use this as an opportunity to help students enhance social-emotional and character development. Be mindful of students who need extra mental health support and help to provide students with supports as needed.  
      2. Opportunity to incorporate restorative circles into the classroom.  Allowing teachers and students to build community through communication.
      3. Provide meaningful interactions with students in class, through school functions, and in general to help develop rapport.
      4. Work with families to help students develop time-management skills and how to communicate with teachers
    3. Creating community and group identity
      1. Start off the year by celebrating the ability to be together again, express gratefulness and engage in community building activities to reinforce school/group identity. 
      2. Provide opportunities for the students to share about their personalities and experiences to develop rapport between the teacher/student and the class as a whole. 
      3. Whole-school activities, rallies carried out by Leadership should focus on re-building school community, class identity. 

Scenario 2 - Fluctuating pandemic, temporary closures once or more during the year

    1. Mental Health/Well-Being
      1. Mental health support staff should identify ahead of time what interventions/procedures worked effectively during closure to have a plan that serves students during any temporary closures. For example, what was the most effective way of checking in with a student? (Phone calls, email, Remind, etc.)
        1. These plans should also be mindful of repeated stress of isolation, return, and re-isolation. 
      2. Unreliable internet connectivity and bandwidth issues creates missed learning and stress. For families that have multiple students and parents working from home this is especially true.  
        1. During closures, recommend staggered synchronous teaching schedules at each school site.  Consider coordinating with feeder districts to create teaching schedules that reduce overlap in synchronous events. 
          1. For example, ensuring that there isn’t overlap with elementary school schedules to ensure students, parents, and staff have flexibility. 
    2. Communication/interaction
      1. Provide positive supervision, safe, and social supports/interactions. When problems arise during daily transitions, those monitoring should use this as an opportunity to help students enhance social-emotional and character development.
      2. Have communication on different protocols ready to message out and/or have these messaged out ahead of time so students/families are not expected to adjust with short notice.
    3. Creating community and group identity
      1. To effectively create a remote learning environment that creates community and belonging and reduces feelings of isolation, teachers need to be trained on activities and strategies that foster community building while teaching remotely.
      2. Buddy system:  Support incoming freshmen and build community by pairing each freshman student with an upper class person. Create a clear buddy ‘job description’ and train student volunteers.
        1.  Support incoming students who are new to the district and are in grades 10-12 with an upper class person.  
        2. Being intentional with existing clubs would be useful in doing this; for instance, utilizing Link Crew.

Scenario 3 - Continued pandemic, shifts of 50% students on campus at a time 

    1. Mental Health/Well-Being
      1. Have a safe, calming place at the school site for students to go to when feeling anxious, stressed, etc. (e.g. Health & Wellness Center). 
      2. Unreliable internet connectivity & bandwidth issues creates missed learning and stress. For families that have multiple students and parents working from home this is especially true.  
        1. During closures, recommend staggered synchronous teaching schedules at each school site.  Consider coordinating with feeder districts to create teaching schedules that reduce overlap in synchronous events.  
    2. Communication/interaction
      1. Provide positive supervision, safe, and social supports/interactions. When problems arise during daily transitions, those monitoring should use this as an opportunity to help students enhance social-emotional and character development.
      2. Have a structured schedule, with clear communication on: expectations, timeframe, and what work is completed in class and at home. 
        1. Assignments for all classes should not be due on the same day of the week as sometimes this results in some students having less time. For example, if all assignments are due on Monday then students who have class on Thursdays/Fridays have less time to work through the assignments.
      3. Focus on increased collaborative interaction between students during online learning. Based on surveys, students feel that group work alleviates stress. Interactions should also be culturally responsive and be sensitive to students' mental health needs, home environments, and privacy.
    3. Creating community and group identity
      1. Provide opportunities for students to socialize, partake in physical activities, club and organization meetings, and more, within the existing schedule and preferably when they are in person. 
      2. To effectively create a remote learning environment that creates community and belonging and reduces feelings of isolation, teachers need to be trained on activities and strategies that foster community building while teaching remotely.
      3. Buddy system: Support incoming freshmen and build community by pairing each freshman student with an upper class person. Create a clear buddy ‘job description’ and train student volunteers.
        1.  Support incoming students who are new to the district and are in grades 10-12 with an upper class person.  
        2. Being intentional with existing clubs would be useful in doing this; for instance, utilizing Link Crew.

Scenario 4 - Continued pandemic, limited students/staff allowed on campus

    1. Mental Health/Well-Being
      1. Mental health staff should be part of the decision making process in identifying which students should be prioritized to be on campus.
      2. Flexibility must be considered for both staff and students alike. For instance, some staff have children and thus are often not able to do scheduled synchronous classes. Furthermore, there are students who have multiple barriers at home which do not allow them to attend all synchronous classes at specific times. In both scenarios and many more, there should be flexibility in the allowance of extra time and space.
      3. Unreliable internet connectivity & bandwidth issues creates missed learning and stress. For families that have multiple students and parents working from home this is especially true.  Recommend staggered synchronous teaching schedules at each school site, however consideration must be made for students who have to work, provide child care, or experience other socio-economic issues that interfere with their participation, learning and stress. For families that have multiple students and parents working from home this is especially true.  
        1. During closures, recommend staggered synchronous teaching schedules at each school site.  Consider coordinating with feeder districts to create teaching schedules that reduce overlap in synchronous events.  
    2. Communication/interaction
      1. Provide positive supervision, safe, and social supports/interactions. When problems arise during daily transitions, those monitoring should use this as an opportunity to help students enhance social-emotional and character development.
      2. Have a structured schedule, with clear communication on: expectations, timeframe, and what work is completed in class and at home.
    3. Creating community and group identity
      1. Provide opportunities for students to socialize, partake in physical activities, club and organization meetings, and more, within the existing schedule. For instance, Fridays could be utilized for digital rallies, club meetings, yoga instruction, structured group meetings, etc.
      2. To effectively create a remote learning environment that creates community and belonging and reduces feelings of isolation, teachers need to be trained on activities and strategies that foster community building while teaching remotely. 
      3. Buddy system: Support incoming freshmen and build community by pairing each freshman student with an upper class person. Create a clear buddy ‘job description’ and train student volunteers.
        1.  Support incoming students who are new to the district and are in grades 10-12 with an upper class person.  
        2. Being intentional with existing clubs would be useful in doing this; for instance, utilizing Link Crew.

Scenario 5 - Continued pandemic, current sheltering restrictions

    1. Mental Health/Well-Being
      1. Provide opportunities for students to engage with counselors/mental health providers within the existing schedule. For instance, tutorial time should include mental health providers availability. Also provide opportunities for students to develop time-management skills and routines.
      2. Flexibility must be considered for both staff and students alike. For instance, some staff have children and thus are often not able to do scheduled synchronous classes. Furthermore, there are students who have multiple barriers at home which do not allow them to attend all synchronous classes at specific times. In both scenarios and many more, there should be flexibility in the allowance of extra time and space. 
      3. Unreliable internet connectivity & bandwidth issues creates missed learning and stress. For families that have multiple students and parents working from home this is especially true.  Recommend staggered synchronous teaching schedules at each school site.  Consider coordinating with feeder districts to create teaching schedules that reduce overlap in synchronous events.
      4. Have a structured schedule, with clear communication on: expectations, timeframe, and what work is completed in class and at home. 
        1. Assignments for all classes should not be due on the same day of the week as sometimes this results in some students having less time. For example, if all assignments are due on Monday then students who have class on Thursdays/Fridays have less time to work through the assignments.
      5. Creation of an advisory period for students to have 1:1 check-ins with teachers and/or staff. This could also be a space and time for students to receive necessary information and have an opportunity to ask clarifying questions. Also an opportunity for teachers to balance the load of supporting ALL our students
    2. Communication/interaction
      1. The amount of emails staff and students receive daily is adding to these populations feeling overwhelmed and stressed. Certain communication options in place should be prioritized/emphasized to students/families as the first mode of communication (e.g. asking questions in tutorial, virtual meetings, etc.) rather than email as at times they tend to be more time consuming than necessary. 
      2. Utilization of school-wide norms regarding when to post assignments, when to collect assignments, when to have assignments in the gradebook, how long to respond back to messages, and other clear work/home boundaries for students and staff alike. 
        1. Assignments for all classes should not be due on the same day of the week as sometimes this results in some students having less time. For example, if all assignments are due on Monday then students who have class on Thursdays/Fridays have less time to work through the assignments.
    3. Creating community and group identity
      1. Provide opportunities for students to socialize, partake in physical activities, club and organization meetings, and more, within the existing schedule. For instance, Fridays could be utilized for digital rallies, club meetings, yoga instruction, structured group meetings, etc.
      2. To effectively create a remote learning environment that creates community and belonging and reduces feelings of isolation, teachers need to be trained on activities and strategies that foster community building while teaching remotely.
      3. Buddy system: Support incoming freshmen and build community by pairing each freshman student with an upper class person. Create a clear buddy ‘job description’ and train student volunteers.
        1.  Support incoming students who are new to the district and are in grades 10-12 with an upper class person.  
        2. Being intentional with existing clubs would be useful in doing this; for instance, utilizing Link Crew.

Addressing Opportunity Gaps in Learning

Subcommittee members: Brittany Cole, Jenee Fawson, Kiran Grewal, Emily Hanson, Laura King, Monica Perez Sanchez, and Leticia Molina



Subcommittee Goal  


Recommend protocols for identifying and then supporting the opportunity gaps experienced by our students. Provide teachers with training and support to ensure that rigorous culturally relevant content is delivered to provide opportunities for students who have experienced a gap in learning.  Support students and parents with the proper trainings and opportunities to access learning, school activities, and prepare for life beyond CUHSD. 


Summary of Recommendations 


Protocol for Identifying Students with Opportunity Gaps- In order to support students most effectively it is crucial to properly identify students. Within the first two weeks of school a student who has missed class or an assignment should be immediately reached out to by the teacher.  

 

Orientation on digital learning and citizenship - In order to help close gaps due to access issues or lack of familiarity with technology systems, training should be provided to students, parents and teachers on distance learning and digital platforms at the beginning of the school year. This could be structured as an orientation class that would include relationship-building and a focus on skills needed for online learning such as time management and organization.


Curriculum planning and new Advisory Roles for Teachers - Training should be provided to teachers on curriculum planning to support a focus on essential standards and quality over quantity of student work. Utilizing instructional time efficiently for key concepts/skills is critical to the success of distance learning  because students with learning gaps will need to recover or review additional information with potentially fewer home resources than their peers.


Effective communication - It is important to establish a clear protocol for communication that targets students with opportunity gaps and their families. This includes communication from sites and teachers to students and their families. Sites should utilize translation services and mailers to improve communication to families.


Structured supports for students with opportunity gaps - There should be a range of academic and skills based supports available for students, including online academic support rooms, a hotline, and one-to-one advisory (see Continuum of Learning Plans section), a parent university, recovery courses, and utilizing aides and paraprofessionals to provide a parallel structure of student outreach and supports.  Additionally, supports for social emotional needs should be communicated regularly and offered in multiple ways (see Staff and Student Well-being)


Prioritize Personal Connections - Relationships are essential to student engagement and learning. Due to the severe limitations of how such relationships will be nurtured through on-going distance learning, we need to put the relationships at the forefront of our planning for next school year. When students are struggling, they need daily and weekly connections with an adult to help them navigate school. Our committee highly recommends a model in which the majority of class instruction continues online, but our students most in need are on campus for Tech Labs/Advisory Groups.  


Targeted Recommendations

Scenario 3 - Continued pandemic, shifts of 30% students on campus  


General Recommendations: School Year


  • During the first two weeks of school provide training for students, parents, and teachers focused on digital learning, citizenship, and relationship building.
  • Recommended Topics:
    • CUHSD Email 
      • How to organize Gmail (folders)
      • Check regularly & archive
      • Teach Email Etiquette 
    • Explicit expectations regarding HOW to navigate selected platform(s) 
    • Time management and organization 
      • Time organization
      • File Organization 
      • How to Organize Google Drive 
      • Note Taking 
        • Taking notes digitally, where to store & revisit
      • Time management during (class) meetings 
    • Using Google Calendar
    • Turning on and off notifications 
  • Using Auto-correct/Spell check
  • Getting students and parents using CUHSD website
  • AVID strategies
  • Practice Mindfulness 

Supports for Teachers

Recommend each site select a platform/ LMS that they will utilize across the entire site. Each school site is moving to either School Loop, Canvas or Google Classroom/Aeries. Sites will work with the district to set up professional development opportunities for teachers before school starts. 

    • Survey teachers to rank current tools or platforms they are using 
    • Have teachers agree on a select few as to not overwhelm students 
    • Examples:
      1. Newsela *potential textbook replacement 
      2. NearPod/PearDeck 
      3. Padlet 
      4. Quizlet 

  • Training and Planning for  Teachers (First 2 weeks of School)
  • Teachers should be provided time to identify essential standards in their curriculums, align with other disciplines, find common skills, create common projects where students can demonstrate mastery once in multiple subjects. Refer to the Highly Effective Instruction section for more details on supporting multiple instructional models. 
      • Recommend that teachers create “Recovery Lessons” to have available to students at the beginning of the year to catch up on content students may not have acquired during distance learning. 
        • Wizer.me and Google Forms with the Add-on Flubaroo are recommended tools for providing students with instant feedback, without extra grading work for teachers. 
    • Teachers will need to rethink assessments in an online or hybrid model. Students should not be brought to campus simply for testing purposes. 
    • Recommend the same platform for each school, students use the same format for logging in to each teacher’s class (see Continuum of Learning Plans).
    • Topics for teacher training/PD:
      1. Training on site selected platform and supporting tools.
      2. Establish best practices for organizing content on selected platform 
        1. Using Topics in Google Classroom
        2. Common Template for all teachers in Canvas 
        3. Remind protocols 
        4. Identify email as the primary communication tool between students and teachers. 
      3. Provide teachers with tools to communicate and  package content that is easily accessible to students.
        1. Organization Templates 
          1. Provide monthly calendar 
          2. Learning Goals, Practice Activities, & Projects/Assessments
        2. Utilize Backwards Design 
          1. Example: World Language Template 
      4. Implicit Bias and Cultural Sensitivity Training 
        1. How to engage in conversations about race and how to be an ally. Possible PD and open dialogue.
      5. Train teachers to incorporate Mindfulness activities for class meetings or Advisory groups
        1. Also see Building Community outlined in DONgles Guide
        2. Provide strategies for teachers to Connect with (English) Learners

      1. Ensure teaching of current standards with proper scaffolding
      2. Utilize Universal Design For Learning checkpoints to help guide scaffolding to meet each student where they are at.
    • Streamline curriculum 
      1. Consider reducing the number of courses students take each semester (3 instead of 6) 
      2. Encourage Quality not Quantity - teach only essential standards & skills
      3. Avoid “rushing through” content that would be covered in a typical year
      4. Minimize “Direct Instruction” (Support: Pacing & Workload) 
      5. Tech TOSA (or Teacher Leaders) weekly share out on successful tools or strategies for distance learning or hybrid model
    • Teacher Support Resources
      1. Topics: Engagement, Building Relationships, Accommodations, Supporting English Learners, healthy social relationships/engagement without face-to-face 
    • Utilize the Staff Portal by creating links to supports based on content areas.  Department Chairs will link supports that the site content teams have identified as helpful to close gaps for students. Teachers can access all Professional Development resources here as well as other supports for students. 
    • Working the site communication team (see Community Engagement) select a place on the site webpage for daily class schedules, tutorial/study hall schedules and support resources, in multiple languages, to be posted for families and students.

Communicating with students

    • Recommend protocol is established in the following areas:
      1. How each communication tool should be used: Remind, Email, Google Classroom notifications, School and District website (so students and parents know where to expect and where to go for information) 
      2. Protocol:
        1. Teacher initiates contact with students and parents via email.
        2. If email is not reciprocated, additional communication attempts should be made via phone (Remind or phone call).
        3. Primary communication with families should be via the phone. Communications should not rely on emails. The teacher advisor commits to making phone calls to their families. Teachers should use Remind to make phone calls home.
    • Add case managers to Google Classroom, CC parents and learning team in all communications with students. 
    • Timely feedback from Teachers with attendance and work completion 
    • Explicit class/course expectations from Teachers to students and parents.
    • Recommend that teachers provide students with a schedule/calendar for the week or month that outlines the learning that will take place.
      1.  Include learning goals, notes for students, a list of practice activities to assist mastery, and possibly a quiz at the end of the week. 
    • Automate calls, messaging to notify parents when students have missed assignments especially in first 2 weeks of school
    • Provide teachers training ong tracking communication in Aeries for connections with students and meetings with families

ON Campus: Establishing Advisory Groups

  1. Invite specific students on campus to join a cohort that is assigned to a teacher or staff member. 
    1. This provides students with the opportunity to complete work in a supportive environment, and check in with an adult regularly who can assist them in navigating online classes and assignments. 
    2. For ELs, this would additionally provide a secure environment for placement testing.
    3. The teacher creates socialization activities, SEL activities, and oversees the student’s individual academic engagement and well-being. The teacher communicates with families and other teachers; counselors, wellness, and Instructional aides who may be asked to work as tutors.

  1. Students are assigned to a cohort that meets once to several times a week depending on the needs of students. 
    1. Consider technology skills or support at home to navigate distance learning platforms. Instead of providing these students with a laptop/hotspot to work at home, convert several classrooms into Tech Labs where students would have support if the county health officials state we can have anyone on campus.. 
    2. Make phone calls, send mailers and emails to families to ensure that students are making it campus when needed.  See the proper protocol for reaching out students above.
    3. If students are not coming/utilizing services, offer a spot to another student or those who need to come multiple times a week.
  2. Training for Staff to lead on site Tech Labs with social distancing
    1. Intro go Google Classroom
    2. Intro to Zoom & Break out rooms
    3. Resources for translation programs 
    4. Adults rotate in (classified staff) by days 
    1. Strategies to Connect with Learners

On Campus: Instruction 

  1. Teachers are on scheduled to be on campus for labs specific to their content area
    1. Writing Labs
    2. Language Labs
    3. Science Labs
  2. Teachers reach out to a group of students to attend specific labs.
  3. Students can sign up by appointment to come to these skill based sessions with teachers.  
  4. Recovery classes 
    1. Math, Social Science, English (recovery or support)
    2. Identify essential skills/standards for students to achieve to recover credit 
      1. As an example, Westmont IM1 Recovery & Distance Learning Plan

Student Groups that Benefit From In Person Instruction:

    1. *Recommend right to a 5th year of HS for following groups
  • Consider AB2121 if students change school during 11th grade - need 130 credits only to graduate. 

  1. ELs and selected RFEPs (based on grades & attendance with approval from parents/guardians)
    1. Invite back on campus for Newcomer ELD, Tech Labs, Support/Recovery classes,   and Placement Assessment 
      1. Need real time feedback for speaking and listening activities (Online classes make listening and speaking activities challenging) 
    2. Newcomer classes have a priority to meet on campus if this is an option for the fall.
    3. Reclassification Assessments - Testing for placement @ beginning of year
      1. Recommend 8 students at a time - by last name to come to campus for testing
    4. Provide budget for online resources that highly benefit ELs including:
      1.  NewsELA - (*will likely require “pro” accounts to access in Fall). 
        1. NewsELA has entire section for Distance Learning & ELs
        2. Padlet 30 ways to use Padlet 
        3. Flocabulary 
  2. Special Education

            Invite back to campus based on necessity (approval from parents and 

            guardians) 

            Benefit from real time feedback, provide multiple means of engagement 

    1. Curated Resources: 
      1. Accommodations for Special Populations    
      2. Universal Design for Learning (UDL Guideline 7.3 Minimize threats and distractions)

Role of Classroom Aides in Supporting Students

    • Define role of classroom aides both online support or in person on campus support room
    • Assign aides and classified staff a caseload of students whom must reach out to weekly to “connect with students” 
      1. *Sample log - every week, identify who is not responding.
      2. Employ Facebook or other social media to reach students.
      3. Actions for reaching out can include:
      4. Calling parents, students, tutoring or providing online tutor resources - tutor.com etc.
      5. Community nights (every Friday) - play games or watch movies together 
      6. Gift card giveaway 
    • Ensure that English Language Aides and SpEd Aides have the technology and access to platforms to help support students (ie: SchoolLoop, school computer, etc).

ONLINE Supports for Students: Academic Support Rooms for Students 

  1. Have a centralized Hotline (on CUHSD website
  2. Have a site centralized platform for students to access technology tutorials and additional support tools: 
    1. Students can make appointments to speak to any credentialed counselor in the district (SEL piece for at risk) or specific site counselor or teachers
    2. Access to a daily schedule of continuous office hours covered by teachers in all subject areas 
    3. Possible schedule for tutorial/office hours/homework help: 8am-8pm or 12pm-9pm
  3. Teachers participate in support room as part of Adjunct Duties (*CHSTA)
    1. Similar to “Homework Club” duties

Student Led Online Supports 

  1. Training for Peer Tutors in first 2 weeks of school for both paraeducators and peer tutors utilizing AVID workbook 
  2. Chat Zoom Room for EL Students 
    1. Student Peer Tutors for ELD run online conversation Zoom chats weekly or biweekly with EL students 
  3. Peer tutors participate in support room by subject area and level (vs. serving as a peer tutor in an individual teacher’s class) 
  4. Tutors would receive credits (as with TAs in physical classroom)
  5. Involve ASB juniors and seniors to host chats with freshmen students as a weekly or biweekly check in.  Could also involve Life Crew.
  6. Student led study groups in break out rooms offered periodically 

    1. EDCENTRAL for students Antelope Valley Union HS District 
      1. How to get on zoom, how to connect to teachers, counselors, live support with tutors and times. 
    2. Offer multiple tools to help students accomplish assignments
      1. Graphic Organizers
      2. Sentence Frames

Supports for Parents

  1. First 2 weeks of School “Parent University” Training 
    1. Small groups (non intimidating) 
    2. Parent led training could continue throughout the year (provide calendar for available trainings)
      1. Offered in multiple languages (led by community liaisons and site ELAC members)
    3. Guided by parent interest
    4. Use Google Classroom as platform for parent professional development
    5. Assure our parent emails are up to date.  
      1. Train parents/guardians on how to obtain free email accounts.
    6. Return to physical mailings for important notices

Communication and Connections - See Community Engagement section which addresses how sites should contact parents and the larger community.

Reopening Steering Committee and Subcommittees Information
COMMITTEE MEETING DATES
 
Wednesday, May 6
Monday, May 11
Wednesday, May 13
Monday, May 18
Wednesday, May 20
Tuesday, May 26
Wednesday, May 27
Tuesday, June 2
Wednesday, June 10
Additional meetings in July to be scheduled as needed
 
COMMITTEE MEMBERS
 
Name Site Position
Abra Evanoff District Office Dir. Student Services
Anna Lucas Del Mar Science Dept. Chair
Brittany Cole Branham English Learner TOSA
Cesar Cabrera-Contreras Del Mar Art Teacher
Chris Nalls Branham Marching Band
Crystal Adams Leigh Assistant Principal
Daron La Franchi District Office Dir. Special Education
Dave Becker Westmont Special Education Teacher - English
Dianne Leo Westmont English Teacher
Emily Hanson District Office Dir. Curriculum & Instruction
Erika Miguel Branham Counselor
Erin Hinshaw Prospect English Teacher
German Cerda District Office Assistant Superintendent
Jason Miller Westmont Principal
Jenee Fawson Westmont Language other than English Dept. Chair
Jennifer Hall Boynton Social Science Dept. Chair
Jennifer Orlick District Office Dir. Innovation
Kira Durant Del Mar Social Science Teacher/Tech TOSA
Leslie Tatsuta CACE Administrator
Melissa Fales Leigh Social Science Teacher
Michael Espinoza Branham English Teacher
Robert Bravo District Office Superintendent
Sarah Foy District Office Coord. Community Engagement
Steven Turner Branham Math Dept. Chair
 
SUBCOMMITTEE MEMBERS
 
Subcommittee Role Members
Student Wellbeing & Community
Co-Chair Cesar Cabrera-Contreras Erika Miguel German Cerda Michael Espinoza    
Volunteer Member Kristie Geist Amanda Davison Kevin Nguyen Eve Walton Bari Sholomon Tessa Corona
Community Engagement
Co-Chair Dianne Leo Sarah Foy        
Volunteer Member Paul Pinza Nathalie Goricanec Sharon Ortegon      
Highly Effective Instruction
Co-Chair Chris Nalls Emily Hanson        
Volunteer Member Sayuri Chen Laurel Garceau Katie Bennett Holly Royaltey Lynette Jackson Tiffany Padia
Continuum of Instructional Plans
Co-Chair Anna Lucas Erin Hinshaw Jennifer Hall Jennifer Orlick Kira Durant Steven Turner
Volunteer Member Barbara West Archana Nekkar Sameen Shoenhair Matt de Cesare    
Student Services Ops Co-Chair Abra Evanoff Melissa Fales        
Student Services Ops - Attendance Volunteer Member Teresa Wagster Sharon Ortegon Cathie Watson-Short Lindsay Shubert    
Student Services Ops - Discipline Volunteer Member Rick Hayashi Jeff Bengford Mike Posey Kerry Murphy    
Student Services Ops - 504 Volunteer Member Justin Ponzio Denise Stephenson Jen Sorkin      
Student Services Ops - Extra-Curricular Volunteer Member Courtney Schembri Laura Saldaña Kim Bartel Stacey Chase    
Student Services Ops - Athletics Volunteer Member Christina Hillman Marita Beard Kerry Murphy      
Special Ed Ops
Co-Chair Daron La Franchi Dave Becker        
Volunteer Member Chee-Ah Thao Leanne Haghighi Cynthia Williams Terri Lopopolo Ophelia Gomez Taylor Wakefield
Student and Staff Safety
Co-Chair Crystal Adams Jason Miller Leslie Tatsuta      
Volunteer Member Nancy Torres Pfeiffer Veronica Ramirez Debbie Phalen Charlie Webster Bobby Joe Stewart Rory McCarthy
Address Learning Gaps
Co-Chair Brittany Cole Jenee Fawson        
Volunteer Member Bobby Joe Stewart Katie Bennett Kiran Grewal Monica Perez Sanchez Leticia Molina  
 
MEETING AGENDAS
Community Input
 
To gather feedback from families and students, the committee has met with the District English Learners Advisory Committee (DELAC), the Superintendent’s Student Advisory Council, and the President’s Council (a group of parent site representatives) to gather additional input.
 
As part of the broader stakeholder feedback process, the committee developed surveys in May to gather feedback from staff and parents/guardians about options for reopening schools in the fall. You can see the results by clicking on the links below. 

Staff Reopening Survey

 

Parent/Guardian Reopening Survey (English)

 

Parent/Guardian Reopening Survey (Spanish)

 

You can also use the information below to see results from the Learning from Home student survey, which was sent to all students via email in early May to learn more about their experiences during distance learning.

 

Learning from Home Student Survey

Username: 4369401

Password: LFHS4369401!1655

 
 
Please fill out the input form below if you have any ideas or questions for the committee to consider.